Beware of aggressive crows

Each springtime crows become loud, aggressive and territorial.

Deepballard writes this warning in the forum:

Was walking south on 32nd, just before 62nd, when a crow dive bombed me from a tree, attacking my head. I thought someone had thrown something at my head until I heard the wings and saw the crow flying back up into the tree. Has this happened to anyone else? I know crows are territorial- so look out at that corner (west side of the street).

The crow scratched Deepballard on the head and drew blood, which the poster cleaned up with hydrogen peroxide. Deepballard asks, “Anyone know if crows carry communicable diseases?”

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Jlynn
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Jlynn

I was attacked a few years ago on NW 73 and Mary Ave while walking my dog. Luckily it just dive bombed my head…no blood.

SunsetHillBob
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SunsetHillBob

While going to school at the UW this happened to me, more than once, while walking on campus. I felt like I was in the movie “The Birds”. Don’t feel singled out–my large Melon seemed to attract the creatures.

yes
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yes

yes – I think they liked my shiny jacket – maybe they thought it was some shiny trash to pick up and eat… those crows are crazy

Bark more, Wag less
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Bark more, Wag less

I wish you could shoot the ****ers.

rehana
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rehana

Happens to me fairly regularly, but they’ve never drawn blood. They’ll veer off if you turn to look at them.

battiato1981
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battiato1981

Crows absolutely dive bomb humans when they are defending their nests. Some years ago it would happen frequently to me while coming and going at the Home of the Good Shepherd building in Wallingford. A pair of crows had built their nest high in a monkey puzzle tree near the main entrance and they would harass many of the people using the main walkway during day. Never drew blood on me though but I can see how they might, they would come very close to the head sometimes. A dive bombing crow is intimidating … but hard to duck when they do it from behind!

name
Guest
name

Cityfolk….Purchase a crow caller, and learn to sound the “alert” call…. the crow’s will leave you alone.

Cindy
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Cindy

I was bbqing steak last night. I ran in to grab a plate and seconds later I came out and they took a steak off the bbq that was on with flame! Crazy birds!

CrowLove
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CrowLove

Never been attacked by a crow, you guys are obviously doing it wrong

Mary Beth
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Mary Beth

Crows only dive-bomb when their babies are fledglings who are nearby on the ground somewhere and aren’t good enough flyers yet to escape predators. You are momentarily being mistaken for a potential predator.

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING — DO NOT strike out at a protective crow. They will recognize and remember you, and harass you for literally years afterward. This has been well documented. So please put up with the brief (May-June) dive bombing in order to have a peaceful coexistence with them the rest of the year.

Have name
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Have name

Which animals eat crows? We need more of those.

ballardmama
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ballardmama

Good advice not to strike out at the crow. Similar to roosters (not that it’s an issue in Seattle). Not too long ago when my real estate agent and I went to look at a farm for sale in Snohomish their rooster rushed out and attacked us. Figuring I was much bigger I just kicked it – dumb move. It then turned on my real estate agent and ended up ripping her jeans and gashing her leg. I’m thinking I may need a crow or a rooster as a watch dog.

Steve
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Steve

They do this sometimes during nesting season if you get too close to a nest. Quite often one of their “children” is on the ground near where they are doing this. I’ve had this happen a number of times.

BallardDINK
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BallardDINK

Is it legal to shoot crows with a BB gun or slingshot?

Edog
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Edog

I’ve been attacked twice, but this was before I lived in Ballard. They don’t bother me when I have the dog with me!

Ballardemician
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Ballardemician

let the crows be — not sure why some people hate them but they are pretty interesting animals IMO, super smart and social.

Now the stupid flicker that drums on my ganvanized roof ducts at sunrise — fire away.

yep
Guest
yep

yummmm. barbequed crow!

I like to add a little jerk seasoning myself.

SteveE
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SteveE

I saw one the other day (60th and 24th) attack a smaller bird, take it to the ground and peck at it, then take it up to the gutters above and I saw feathers flying and only one bird leave. It was crazy to watch it.

Emily
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Emily

Crows do not carry diseases that are easily passed to humans. You’re more likely to pick up a generally bioavailable bacteria from talon scratches (i.e. something that was on the tree). I wouldn’t worry about anything catching.

To all those who think crows should be shot, eaten or terrorized out of their homes: crows are intelligent animals. They know we (humans) can be cruel and unpredictable, hence sometimes striking out preemptively when their young are vulnerable. It’s nothing we or our dogs or cats wouldn’t do in the same situation. How many wolves, bears and cougars have been hurt to get them out of our general breeding grounds, even when they pose no “clear and present” threat?

If you hear crazily screaming crows, cross to the other side of the street. They will understand this as you getting out of the way and as posing less of a threat.

GregS
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GregS

Deepballard asks, “Anyone know if crows carry communicable diseases?”

No, but I’ve seen them carrying twinkies, and those can be big trouble.

wawinegirl
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wawinegirl

Crows are extremely intelligent creatures. Don’t lash out at them, they will remember. I had a crow that remembered me when I was younger and every morning would come sit by me when I was waiting on the gate by the driveway while my mom backed the car up. Uw studies 5 groups of crows and if you notice when the sun is setting large groups of these birds will come together for the night. I love them. Sorry you got hurt!

Ryan
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Ryan

It’s fledgling-learn-to-fly season. If you hear a crow squaking at you, cross to the other side of the street. If you see a small crow hopping around on the ground, stay away from it our momma will be bombing you.

Lisa McG
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Lisa McG

(1) when I was a kid with lush, super-shiny hair, several species of birds would, in the Spring, look at my noggin as nest fodder. for that, and for protective their young, I cannot and do not blame them. You drive too fast and too close to my kidlet in a cross-walk: you get the same treatment. ;)

(2) Crows can also be charming and thoughtful. We have one born on our block two years ago who greets several of us as we return home. He even visited me at a nearby park one afternoon. His mother, who frequently used a neighbor’s birdbath (and used his tree as her nesting site), once flew down and landed at neighbor’s feet and delivered a rock that had a flower growing out of it — like a gift of thanks for the hospitality.
– – –

ballardcrab
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ballardcrab

True Story: Last week-end I wasn’t feeling well and had been house-bound for some time. I looked through the window at my back yard and there on perched on the fence top, 7 crows all in a row! I laughed at the ‘omen’! That will make a person feel better in no time!!!

Glassglug
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Glassglug

We’ve got two nesting pairs of Western Scrub Jays outside our building, and they not only dive-bomb, but then perch on the nearest branch and stare at you as if to say, “Are you looking at *me*?” The De Niros of the bird world. I actually like them.