Tax day rally on Market Street

Today is April 18th – tax day for 2011. (We hope this isn’t news to anyone.)

Around noon today people gathered in front of the Bank of America branch at NW Market Street for a tax day rally. According to the moveon.org website, which organized the gathering, “At hundreds of events from coast to coast, we’ll present tax bills to corporate tax dodgers for the billions of dollars their legions of lobbyists helped them avoid. We’ll organize a peaceful, dignified, and powerful day of action to call on corporations to pay their fair share. And we’ll demand that our elected leaders make them pay.” The site states that in 2009, Bank of America paid $0 in taxes. (Photo courtesy Lina Raymond.)

51
Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Maybe Obama’s boot licker Jeffrey Immelt at GE could pay some taxes.

Kim Il-sung
Guest
Kim Il-sung

Actually we need to cut tax loop holes, remove all the Bush cuts (on the rich AND middle class), raise retirement age to 70, ration Medicare/aid and cut social services to balance the budget(s). But don’t let reality ruin a day in the sun yelling ‘hey hey, ho ho, blah dee blah has got to go”.

Charles
Guest

Um, I believe the tax day protests are a call for cutting tax loop holes so uh, that reality thing is perfectly understood. thanks!

Kim Il-sung
Guest
Kim Il-sung

But you can bet they don’t want cuts either; that’s the reality they ignore. Raising taxes alone won’t solve this problem.

This country is being destroyed by left wing and right wing crazies.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Well…according to the IRS about half the people in that photo who are griping paid no taxes at all. And of those that did, it is likely that most (if not all) took advantage of some sort of tax “loophole” that allowed them to reduce their overall tax burden.

In 2009, the top 10 percent of earners paid about 73% of all federal income tax collected.

The bottom 40 percent, on average, make a profit from the federal income tax system, meaning they get more money in tax credits than they would otherwise owe in taxes. For those people, the government sends them a payment.

But, of course, they aren’t protesting in front of the average family of four in Crown Hill…

simo hayha
Guest
simo hayha

I actually saw the protest occurring, and there were generalized signs for all people to pay their fair share of taxes, not just B of A. It was a pretty non-crazy protest, and there were no funny hats or puppets or anything. But judge away, judgey.

Kim Il-sung
Guest
Kim Il-sung

Were they calling for more or less government spending? If it was te latter, they are part of the problem.

Reasonable people know the only solution is ending the bush cuts (a lot of which went to the middle class) and cutting spending, especially for Social Security, medicare/aid and defense.

BBO
Guest
BBO

Believe me I support the message to eliminate corporate loopholes, but I wondered about how many of those people paid taxes, and how many of them voted in recent elections.

Also, I saw signs referring to foreclosures and such………I know the banks are predators by nature, but what ever happened to personal responsibility. Nobody made people take adjustable rate loans, or refinance their homes to pay for cars, credit card debt, and vacations.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I know this is the latest right wing talking point, and that you’re just repeating what you’ve been told to repeat, but you’ve been given misleading information. That only applies to federal income taxes. The poorest 40% still pay all the other taxes the rest of us do. Fees, licenses, gas taxes, food taxes, road taxes, property taxes, payroll taxes, and on and on and on. If you work at McDonalds making a poverty level wage, you still pay over 10% of your income on taxes. Profit my ass. You try living on less than $14k a year, then come back and tell us you still think the poor need to shoulder even more taxes. That they aren’t paying their fair share. That they’re living high on federal income tax refund “profits”. Boohoo, the wealthiest people in the history of the human race pay a lot of taxes. Those richest 10% receive more income than the bottom 50% of the country combined. They also enjoy the best lifestyle in the history of the human race because of it. And on many taxes, there is a ceiling; Somebody earning $10 million pays the same social security taxes as somebody earning $106,800.… Read more »

mcbealer
Guest
mcbealer

dang it! I wish I had known about this ahead of time …

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I was quite clear about where the taxes are being collected (or not), and the information I provided is not at all misleading. I specifically referred to federal income taxes. Nowhere did I discuss or debate any other taxes, or engage in any class warfare arguments. You also assert that I suggested the poor should shoulder a greater federal tax burden (I didn’t), that they aren’t paying their “fair share” (I didn’t) and that they are “living high” on tax profits (I didn’t say that either). I would respectfully invite you to actually read posts before commenting on them, and making personal attacks (I don’t simply repeat “what I’ve been told to repeat”) By the way, you used the term “refund” – I didn’t. If one doesn’t actually pay federal taxes, and instead receives a cash grant from the federal government, it can’t accurately be called a “refund”. Again, I simply pointed out that a significant number of the people protesting here are likely not paying anything in federal income taxes, and in fact may be getting a taxpayer funded federal cash grant at tax time. They target corporations because it is an easy media stunt. But they could just… Read more »

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

What you omit, and what you imply, is just as important as the literal words you present. Ignoring all of your other attempts to deflect and change the subject…

The only “stunt” is making billions in income, and not paying on that income. Being poor is not a loophole.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

I made no attempt to deflect anything. And suggesting I omitted discussion of consumption taxes, local and state taxes and fees, wealth distribution equity, etc. is akin to accusing me of omitting discussion of what I had for breakfast. It simply wasn’t relevant.

The issue being discussed was/is the federal income tax system. The protesters seem to be suggesting that BofA is unfairly taking advantage of federal tax loopholes in order to reduce its tax burden. I simply pointed out that most of those in attendance at the “rally” are in all probability doing the exact same thing.

You brought up non-federal taxes and fees, and started in with the class warfare arguments. And then took a shot at my integrity in the process.

I certainly did not change the subject – you did.

Steve
Guest
Steve

Reasonable people also know that won’t solve the problem either. The deficit in 2010 was $1.3T. That is about 1/3 of the budget, I don’t think anyone is going to cut spending that much. They had a tough time with $38B.

Guest
Guest
Guest

SeaYar – how do you have any idea what the people you see protesting pay in taxes? You have no way of validating your argument. What BoA and GE don’t pay is documented. I don’t see what your argument is here.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Unless you want to disband the military you’re not really going to make much of a dent in the spending.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Between 45% and 50% of all workers in the United States pay no federal income tax at all. But you’re right – I can’t validate what each specific person in that crowd paid in federal income tax. So I’ll concede that it is (remotely) possible that the group gathered at this particular protest was not a representative example and perhaps most or all of them pay federal income tax – though I think that would be highly, highly improbable. I would suggest it is a safe bet that this group was reasonably representative of average American workers.

Tiffany
Guest
Tiffany

They also didn’t make 4 billion dollars in profit.

Mamageeta
Guest
Mamageeta

Well SeaYar (own a yacht, do you?), since you KEEP making the assertion that “half the people griping paid no taxes at all” I feel the need to set you straight. I was one of those protesting Bank of America’s $0 tax payment, and I PAID my $365 tax liability on the $12,400 unemployment compensation I collected in 2010, even though I couldn’t afford it. I honestly don’t understand HOW you can justify making those accusations against modest or low income workers while coming to the DEFENSE of big corporations NOT paying their fair share (BofA has not just “reduced its tax burden”, its ELIMINATED it), unless you are (as I suspect) one of those corporate execs that make over $500K a year. For some corporation taking in $4 billion a year, $3 million in taxes is NOT unreasonable. For someone making only $24K a year, $1K in taxes IS… and THAT’S why we aren’t “protesting in front of the home of an average family of four “.

BBO
Guest
BBO

Why the attack on SeaYar? Heshe merely gave some balance to this thread. I read what was posted, but others made assertions and attributed to the post. This is another small sign of the recklessness individuals have displayed with their personal finances that have hurt this country. I know many people are hurt and that big corporations have profited in some cases, but as individuals we need to be smarter and look in the mirror before blaming others and disparaging others out of anger and jealousy.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Don’t own a yacht, and make a modest income supporting a family of four. I’m certainly not poor, but neither am I wealthy. And I am nowhere even close to making over $500k per year. I am fortunate to have a job – though I was unemployed for nearly six months within the past couple of years. I get by, paycheck to paycheck, like most people. And I’m not coming to the defense of big corporations – I’m pretty sure they can defend themselves well enough without my help. Just pointing out the likely hypocrisy in these types of protests. Complaining that corporations that follow the law with regard to tax filing, and leverage the elements of the code that limit what they pay is exactly what most everyone does – including the people who were protesting. Do you or any of the other people in that protest not take the deductions and exemptions you are entitled to under the law, and instead pay the full amount of tax that would be owed without those deductions? I suspect not. Since you brought up your situation, I’m not an accountant, but I find it difficult to believe that someone with only… Read more »

Mamageeta
Guest
Mamageeta

Why the attack on SeaYar? Like I stated in my post, his/her repetitive assertion that ‘half those (protesters) griping paid no taxes at all’… a notion I had noticed YOU also posted previously. So I, being one of the tax-paying, voting protesters ask you, Why SeaYar and your attacks on ME? I’m for ALL Americans paying their FAIR SHARE!

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

Apparently, BofA paid no federal income taxes in 2009 because it actually lost money overall for common shareholders in 2009 once paying back the federal bailout money (TARP) was taken into account. It did pay federal income tax in 2010 (about $900 million).

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous

BofA also didn’t make 4 billion dollars in profit in 2009, after taking account of the payback of federal bailout money (TARP); they lost money for the common stockholders.

Mamageeta
Guest
Mamageeta

No dependents, so EIC not applicable. Still had job (briefly) in 2010, earned $2400 gross (not significant income), FIT withheld. Don’t itemize; never cared to. Filed 1040EZ, took standard single filer deduction of $9350 against $14700 AGI=$5400 taxable income=$543 tax due. Less FIT withheld=$365 tax owed and PAID. I’ve never had a problem with, nor complained about paying taxes in my life (I’m 60). Our country and our government can’t run on NOTHING. I just have a problem with other people complaining about(or more importantly, not paying) THEIR taxes. And I agree, it’s our government LETTING corporations and the wealthy off the hook with the current tax codes, but a grateful and patriotic person should be willing to pay their fair share for living and working in this country. I may be naive, but I believe most working class people feel the same. Unfortunately we’ll always have people trying to hold onto all the money they have, and for this reason we need government to stand up for the middle class. In the end, I’d like to think I was protesting corporate greed not only for me, but also for you, in the financial support of your family of four… Read more »