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Fremont Brewing to expand with production facility in Ballard

Posted by Danielle Anthony-Goodwin on August 4th, 2014

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By Joe Veyera

According to a report from the Puget Sound Business Journal, Fremont Brewing Co. has announced its plans to open a new production facility in Ballard.

Matt Lincecum, the founder of the brewery, told the PSBJ that they are expanding to a light-industrial warehouse at 4700 Ninth Ave. N.W., while also keeping their existing brewery and pub at 3409 Woodland Park Ave. N. According to the article:

The company will convert an approximately 80,000-square-foot building on Ninth Avenue from a print shop to a brewery. Lincecum expects to open early next winter. He’s in the process of putting together the construction and engineering team and is not taking any solicitations from additional builders and designers.

Lincecum said he and building consultants are “looking into every possible way to reduce our carbon footprint,” including installing solar panels, a CO2 recapture system and energy efficiency upgrades at the Ninth Avenue building.

As reported by the PSBJ late last month, the building was purchased by Suzie Burke’s Fremont Dock Co. from David McCallum for $10.25 million. The brewery will replace print company DCG1, which is moving to a new building in South Seattle.

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“We’re expanding to meet market demand,” Lincecum told the PSBJ. “We have experienced phenomenal growth and acceptance by the community.”

To read the full report from the PSBJ’s Marc Stiles, click here.

(Photo courtesy of the King County Assessor’s Office)

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3 reader comments so far ↓

  • 1 John // Aug 4, 2014 at 3:56 pm

    Now they can rename their brewery to Frelard Brewing.

  • 2 Uncle Pete // Aug 4, 2014 at 11:08 pm

    Beer has been played out for years, where’s the weed!?

  • 3 salty // Aug 5, 2014 at 10:29 am

    oh Fremont, don’t do it. Overexpansion and greediness has killed many a fine brewery. Your first brewery is going to end up paying for the new brewery, everything’s going to turn to shoestrings and loans, and your consistency and quality are going to suffer. You’re digging yourself a financial grave.

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