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Ballard Development update: subdivisions off Market Street and rowhomes to replace historic farmhouse

Posted by Halynn Blanchard on July 31st, 2015

Today we see several submitted sudivision applications, including two off Market Street. We also are given notices of an approved apartment complex for Phinney Ave, and an updated design review for a 3-story structure on 17th and 58th. A double design review meeting takes place August 17th for two more 4-story apartment structures coming to both 15th and 17th.

Meanwhile, a historic 1895 farmhouse–once B&B– faces demolition to make way for 3-story rowhomes on 61st and 20th.

This week’s development update is provided by the City of Seattle’s Department of Planning and Development (DPD) as posted in the Land Use Information Bulletin.

Applications:

3227 NW MARKET STMapForNotice20175

A Land Use Application  has been proposed to subdivide one development site into four unit lots. The construction of residential units is under Project #6427253. This subdivision of property is only for the purpose of allowing sale or lease of the unit lots. Development standards will be applied to the original parcel and not to each of the new unit lots.

3400 NW MARKET ST 

A Land Use Application has been proposed to subdivide one development site into two unit lots. The construction of residential units is under Project #6480366. This subdivision of property is only for the purpose of allowing sale or lease of the unit lots. Development standards will be applied to the original parcel and not to each of the new unit lots.

316 NW 41ST ST

A Land Use Application has been proposed to subdivide one development site into two unit lots. The construction of residential units is under Project #6480366. This subdivision of property is only for the purpose of allowing sale or lease of the unit lots. Development standards will be applied to the original parcel and not to each of the new unit lots.

2000 NW 61ST ST

A Land Use Application has been proposed to allow a 3-story rowhouse building containing 6 units. Parking for 6 vehicles to be provided. Existing structure– historic farmhouse built in 1895– to be demolished. We will update you more on this in the near future.

 

 

Decisions:

A Land Use Application has been grated to allow a 3-story structure containing 27 apartment units at 3635 Phinney Ave N. Existing structures to be demolished. No vehicle parking proposed; twenty-two bike spaces provided.

Notice of Streamlined Design Review:

1552 NW 58TH ST

A Streamlined Design Review has been submitted to allow a 3-story structure containing 16 small efficiency dwelling units and 2 apartments (totaling 18 residential units). Existing single family residence to be removed.

The Director will accept written comments to assist in the preparation of the early design guidance through August 12, 2015. The public is invited to offer comments regarding important site planning and design issues.

Notice of Design Review Early Design Guidance Meeting:

1506 NW 61ST ST

A Land Use Application has been proposed to allow a 4-story structure containing 33 residential units. No parking proposed. Existing structures to be demolished.

The meeting will take place August 17th at 6:30 p.m. at the Ballard Community Center (6020 28th Ave) in the Sunset/Captain Ballard Room.

The Director will accept written comments to assist in the preparation of the early design guidance through August 17th, 2015. The public is invited to offer comments regarding important site planning and design issues.

6301 15TH AVE NW

A Land Use Application has been proposed to allow a 4-story structure containing 61 residential units and 2 live-work units with 2,500 sq. ft. of ground level retail space. No parking is proposed. Existing structures to be demolished.

The meeting will take place August 17th at 8 p.m. at the Ballard Community Center (6020 28th Ave) in the Sunset/Captain Ballard Room.

The Director will accept written comments to assist in the preparation of the early design guidance through August 17th, 2015. The public is invited to offer comments regarding important site planning and design issues.

Comments about the above notices should be submitted to PRC@seattle.gov or mailed to the address below:

City of Seattle DPD PRC
700 5th Avenue Suite 2000
PO Box 34019
Seattle, WA  98124-4019

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31 reader comments so far ↓

  • 1 Charles B // Jul 31, 2015 at 4:03 pm

    Is there something particularly interesting about the farm house other than it being old? The architecture doesn’t stand out as anything special in particular.

    Was it the home of any local famous citizens?

    Not sure I see a need to get bent out of shape for this particular building. Its on quite a large lot and all of the units that would replace it would come with an individual parking spot.

    If the building itself has strong sentimental value to some folks, perhaps the folks who are paying to move the “up” house would think about moving this one too?

  • 2 steve treadway // Jul 31, 2015 at 4:09 pm

    And the destruction continues in our city, with no management of the delirious growth pace!!! They are gonna have a much harder time destroying phinney ridge as there is a grassroots group that is gonna fight all the developers and slimy politicians that now have there sights set on the Ridge!!!! I think i see and feel a tipping point in this city as most people i see and talk too are pissed off at what is happening. Vote against all incumbents!!!

  • 3 skipoar // Jul 31, 2015 at 4:18 pm

    Hey Charles, is there something particularly interesting about a 3-story rowhouse?

  • 4 mary // Jul 31, 2015 at 4:20 pm

    Well, you do sound delirious! Where do you see anything about Phinney Ridge? 36th and Phinney? What?

    Anyhoodle, I guess it’s all who you hang out with because lots of people are thrilled that Seattle is finally becoming a city! Sure lots of people aren’t, but the train has left the station. For example, do you realize how many tech employees are moving here? We interview out-of-staters on the regular. We must make room for all comers!

    I see it not as destruction, but improvement. But to each hi/her own I guess.

  • 5 Simon // Jul 31, 2015 at 4:26 pm

    “do you realize how many tech employees are moving here?”

    Judging by all the socially maladjusted males and borderline Aspergers cases I see, too many.

  • 6 mary // Jul 31, 2015 at 4:42 pm

    Ah Simon, I see you mastered the short hand of stereotyping people (with the added talent of making fun of folks with a spectrum disorder, well done you!)

    At any rate, they are often job creators (start-up anyone?) and they also spend their truckloads of money in local businesses, so I say welcome!

  • 7 fredferd // Jul 31, 2015 at 4:43 pm

    Lord I hate this city more everyday. What a truly beautiful home that was. But screw history right? Seattle will never be a workable “big” city – the geography prevents it in many many ways. But hey, lets just tear down everything that made it a place people wanted to live for crackerjack prize rowhouses because 30,000 12 year old amazon workers want to live here now. ah bleep….

  • 8 Bart // Jul 31, 2015 at 5:10 pm

    I agree with a few above that the ‘historic B&B’ is not much to look at and has served it’s useful purpose.
    That’s the sort of lot that needs density, especially given it’s proximity to transit.

    I personally moved here for the mountains and water, not some dumpy little bungalows.

  • 9 Left Ballard // Jul 31, 2015 at 7:07 pm

    The best things about Seattle aren’t really in Seattle, and you don’t have to be there either. Those things being wide open waterfronts, mountains, and trees. The BLANK and BLANK restaurants are OK when you’re 25 but everyone has to grow up.

  • 10 The One // Jul 31, 2015 at 7:11 pm

    @Bart

    Dumpy little bungalows? Do you know the materials that they are using for the new rowhouses and townhomes? Not high quality and they build them in less than a month in some cases. The tech community is destroying (or has already destroyed) the character of San Francisco…and they will do the same to Seattle…as we can see in Ballard. Oh…and just pile on the homeless and tent cities on top of everything. Thank you Mike O’ Brien!

  • 11 Ann S. // Jul 31, 2015 at 8:04 pm

    The zillow listing on the farmhouse shows a lovely interior featuring original architectural details (mahogany staircase, hardwood floors, clawfoot tub), plus tasteful updates (skylights, open kitchen with island)…not to mention a huge, deciduous tree in the yard. This was far, far from a dumpy bungalow. Where is a historic society on this one? It should be a crime to demolish it.

  • 12 seattleite // Jul 31, 2015 at 9:29 pm

    Mary, I don’t know how many cities you’ve lived in…I’ve lived in several around the nation….and when I arrived in Seattle what stood out was its wonderful neighborhoods. Merely growing larger and packing in more people is not what makes a city great. Guaranteed in 20 years this new construction is going to be cheap and nasty looking stuff revealing the haste with which it was made. More vibrant and wise cities have managed to retain historic and old homes and not have to live with regretting destroying what made their city lovely. Who was it who said “Seattle’s a nice city…why are they tearing it down?”

  • 13 Mary // Jul 31, 2015 at 9:40 pm

    This evening I was walking by the 1895 farmhouse on 61st and 20th that’s going to torn down. It’s a beautiful house. Three people who were walking by also said that, and were also sad. I wish this grand old home could be converted to little apartments or I’d even go for an apodment style conversion. The house and trees add so much character to the area…it feels like a home.

  • 14 Bart // Aug 1, 2015 at 6:45 am

    “plus tasteful updates (skylights, open kitchen with island)…. Where is a historic society on this one?”

    Well, if there were really ‘tasteful updates’, it’s not really historic then, is it?

    @the One– I would take my chances in a big earthquake in any new building (from the past 10-15 years) then some old shack that’s not even properly tied to the foundation.

    Most of our old housing stock is total junk. Say what you want about new finish materials, but those old houses were not built any better. A drunk Norwegian is no master craftsman.

  • 15 steve treadway // Aug 1, 2015 at 8:38 am

    @mary, i didn’t say anything about 36th and phinney, I am talking about phinney ridge and the new proposd 60 unit apodement with ZERO parking to be located where the stumbling goat and korthaus tavern is located. And yes the people i hang out with give a Sh^%#t about our neighborhoods what is happening to them. I welcome managed growth and new people to the community. But just cramming tons of people into small crummy expensive units is a joke!!! I don’t know about you but all this congestion is driving a lot of people crazy!! We need a moratorium on this un managed growth and a rethink onwhat we are doing. It is not too late for Phinney Ridge

  • 16 Harry blanco // Aug 1, 2015 at 9:09 am

    @steve treadway

    In the time it takes to blather on the message board, I would recommend you instead read about our state’s growth management act.

    Development is and will continue in Seattle. If you want things frozen in time, I invite you up to shoreline, other than our station areas. I must warn you though, it does earn its name snoreline for a reason.

  • 17 Steve // Aug 1, 2015 at 6:42 pm

    The last link is bad or missing, it doesn’t take you to the dentist office being torn down on 56th and 17th

  • 18 Sal // Aug 1, 2015 at 7:02 pm

    Oh no, not a dentist office, too!

    Was this dentist also a big game hunter? That would make it even more tragic.

    The “historic B&B” is really a joke. Anyone foolish enough to think this place adds value needs to leave.

  • 19 steve treadway // Aug 1, 2015 at 7:27 pm

    I know all about the states growth management act and it has reached and surpassed all its goals, and than some in most areas especially ballard, the infrastructure is not in place to handle all the new growth . Why don’t you go blather on the shoreline Blogs!!!

  • 20 Ann S. // Aug 1, 2015 at 9:31 pm

    Egad Bart. “Historic” is not defined as “authentic 1895 living history.” Just because a home has a skylights added to an upper floor and an island in a large kitchen does not mean the home also does not largely historic. With your reasoning, any 120 year old home with indoor plumbing and electricity wouldn’t be considered historic either. As for the earthquake, the old wooden structures can be easily bolted to their foundations, which is a heck of a lot cheaper than rebuilding entirely. And as for your last point, well, the Norwegians WERE master craftsmen and used solid, strong materials for building. You appear to be grasping at straws. Listen, I understand that growth must come to Seattle. I also understand that there are poorly built structures in Ballard that are probably best replaced. The problem is that the vast majority of development is occurring with no or very little aesthetic integrity.

  • 21 ferdfred // Aug 3, 2015 at 8:45 am

    I urge you to send DPD a comment on whichever property you feel strongly about. We can moan all we want here, but until and unless they start hearing loud and clear that this kind of wanton destruction of history has to stop, there will only be more of it.

  • 22 Biz // Aug 3, 2015 at 9:11 am

    Why is nobody talking about 3227 Market St?

    Maybe you don’t know?

    I just received the DPD announcement dated July 30th, 2015 that the public comment period for this PROPOSED project of 4 lots subdivision and 4 over height restriction (via ski slope roof ramp access) building will be being built. The public comment period ends August 12.

    EXCEPT……the 4 units are almost completed?! Meaning once again….the public comments mean not a thing.

    I called to inquire and am told that is the #1 complaint they receive….ya wonder why? Another contact called me at 730am on a sunday and left a rambling message about what the project is going to be and totally avoided my concern.

  • 23 30sballarddad // Aug 3, 2015 at 11:10 am

    All of the people complaining about the growth will still sell their homes to developers x number of years down the line because the offer will be $100K more for their house.

    I also agree with one of the previous comments about quality construction. Anything built post-war (1940-1950) ish in ballard is not of that high of construction quality. To be fair, many of the buildings going in are far worse (the several story building going up near the brown bear car wash), but many do look like very high quality, like the one on 24th and 65th.

  • 24 John // Aug 3, 2015 at 11:40 am

    Seattle is going to look hilarious in 20 years. The styles of all these new apartments/condos are so specific to current trends. It’s like going by a house and thinking, “Wow, that was built in the 80s.”

    People will be in Seattle thinking, “Wow, was this entire city built in the 2010s?”

  • 25 Peter // Aug 3, 2015 at 12:39 pm

    I think the character of Ballard has improved quite a bit since I was a kid. There’s a lot more going on now than 20-30 years ago, and that has a lot more to do with the people that live here than when the houses were built. The main problem I see is that it’s getting to be too expensive, which I think can be mitigated in part with more density. People will still want to live here if we stop building homes today, but a limited amount of houses available will just push prices even higher (like in San Fransisco).

  • 26 David // Aug 3, 2015 at 1:25 pm

    Ballard is quickly becoming a tenement. Giant ugly box after giant ugly box. It’s like there is only one architect for all these new condo buildings and they never went to architecture school. They are so hideous and it makes me very sad. I loved walking by that beautiful farmhouse on 20th.

  • 27 Profile photo of Mondoman Mondoman // Aug 3, 2015 at 3:53 pm

    biz, what’s the project number on that development you mentioned?

  • 28 Bob // Aug 4, 2015 at 2:41 pm

    Better Ballard than Magnolia

  • 29 William (Bill) Leak // Aug 5, 2015 at 10:32 am

    Whip saw, comes to my mind.
    Supply & demand is a double edge sword.
    Remember, the Great Recession saw little construction for 3-5 years, depending upon the region.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-07-28/your-rent-s-about-to-get-even-higher

  • 30 Biz // Aug 6, 2015 at 3:38 pm

    Mondo,

    Project #3020579

    You can click the link above in the article.

  • 31 Janet // Jul 17, 2016 at 9:30 pm

    A long with the new houses (I call them ruins) come people, more drugs, traffic and high rent prices-but if you have all the Amazon people moving in and buying them up-who cares? Ballard use to be a beautiful place to live.
    Now we have more rats (they have to move too) and really tons of DRUGS. Money can buy anything-take a look at Ballard.
    Does anyone even want to fight this? I’m on board if anyone has any ideas

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