Throwback Thursday: dog days of summer in Ballard

With summer in full swing, we look back at what the warmer months looked like 100 years ago.

Carl Henry Moen in a barrel on a beach in Salmon Bay, circa 1910. According to MOHAI, “Carl Henry Moen was born in Seattle in 1892 to Norwegian immigrant parents. His family moved several times as he was growing up, but settled in Ballard when he was nine years old. He helped harvest and sell the produce, milk, and poultry his family raised, and also was a messenger for Western Union, dug clams, and worked for Bemis Bag Co. Eventually he left home and began a 30-year career as a sailor, crossing the Pacific Ocean over 200 times .”

Group listening to wax cylinder recordings on Ballard Beach, Seattle, ca. 1913. The group is shown on the beach listening to a machine playing wax cylinder recordings. Ed Moen is the boy at center; Jake Jacobson is also in the photo.

Glen Bigelow and Ed Moen on camping trip, ca. 1910. The Moen brothers often went camping just north of Ballard, in what was then undeveloped land.

All photos courtesy MOHAI

 

Throwback Thursday: Ballard’s men of yesteryear

In honor of Father’s Day on Sunday, here’s a look back at Ballard’s forefathers.

This photo, titled, “Ballard Scandinavian Halibut Man” was taken by  Josef Scaylea in 1956.

Photographer Carl Henry Moen took this photo of his father, Ole Moen, and brother on the porch of their Ballard home in 1910. His younger sister, Agnes, can be seen looking through the window behind them.

According to MOHAI, “Carl Henry Moen was born in Seattle in 1892 to Norwegian immigrant parents. His family moved several times as he was growing up, but settled in Ballard when he was nine years old. He helped harvest and sell the produce, milk, and poultry his family raised, and also was a messenger for Western Union, dug clams, and worked for Bemis Bag Co. Eventually he left home and began a 30-year career as a sailor, crossing the Pacific Ocean over 200 times .”

Also by Carl Henry Moen, a photo of his father, Ole. According to the calendar on the wall, the photographer snapped this photo of his father reading his newspaper in April 1910.

According to MOHAI, this man ran a refreshment stand at the end of the streetcar line on the northwest corner of 36th Avenue and 64th Street in Ballard. (Also by Carl Henry Moen, 1910)

All photos courtesy of MOHAI

Throwback Thursday: Winter in Ballard

It seems that the cold weather is now officially upon us, so the My Ballard team wanted to take a look back at some photos of Ballard winters in times gone by.

The photo below features the home of John Nowicki at 6756 22nd Avenue NW taken in 1895 during a heavy fall of snow.

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The torn photo below features a Ballard Avenue street scene during the 1916 snow storm. Jeweler’s street clock on left. Trolley. Ballard City Hall and bell tower can be seen in the background.

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The below photo features Market St under snow in 1900.

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Do you have an amazing photo of Ballard in the winter? Email it to tips@myballard.com

Photos courtesy of Ballard Historical Society

Throwback Thursday: The “new” Ballard Bridge turns 76

The Ballard Bridge, as we know it today, officially opened on June 8, 1940, so we wanted to celebrate with this week’s Throwback Thursday post.

The first Ballard Bridge, pictured below, opened in December 1917. By 1940, however, the old wooden bridge was considered too dangerous to carry the increased traffic and was replaced by a newer bridge with a higher span.

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The photo below shows the opening day celebrations for the new Ballard Bridge on June 8, 1940.

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Photos courtesy of MOHAI.

Throwback Thursday: Ballard streets then and now

Our friend Sue over at the Vintage West Woodland blog featured some “then and now” photos of Ballard streets and we wanted to share them with our readers in today’s Throwback Thursday post.

The below photos show a “then and now” view of the area surrounding 1148 NW 54th Street. Originally, Ballard Street Department Barn Number 4 called this address home and can be seen in the below photo, dated 1914.

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According to Vintage West Woodland, Street Department Barns were used to house horses, wagons, and tools needed to build the boulevards and byways in our growing city. Piles of muddy planks can be seen in the above photo that may have been pulled from one of Ballard’s muddy lanes.

Sue reports that planked sidewalks and roadways could be seen in our neighborhood until the 1930s, when “large scale paving efforts began in the neighborhood.”

These days, the same address looks wildly different and is home to the back of the recently constructed Koi Apartments (shown in the below photo taken this year).

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Thanks again Sue for the photos and the fascinating information.

Throwback Thursday: Then and Now

Today’s Throwback Thursday post, courtesy of our news partners at The Seattle Times, features a glimpse into the past of a home still standing on the corner of 4th Ave NW and NW 60th St.

According to the report, the home was built in the 1890s most likely by carpenter-contractor Rasmus “Robert” Jensen who stands on the front porch in the photo below with his wife, Marie, and their daughter, Anna.

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Below you can see Susan Pierce and her son Andy standing in front of the same home today. Pierce and Andy live in the home that stands directly east across Fourth Ave from the former Jensen residence.

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Pierce has been documenting the history of the West Woodland area on her blog Vintage West Woodland and via organization’s Facebook page.

Thank you Sue for sharing these photos and information with the My Ballard team. Photos courtesy of MOHAI and The Seattle Times.

Throwback Thursday: March in years gone by

Today, we wanted to search through the Ballard Historical Society photo archives for some photos of the neighborhood taken in the month of March in years gone by!

The below photo, taken in March 1908, shows two vessels being built at Cooke and Lake Boat Building Yard.

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This photo was taken on March 20, 1914, and shows views of Ballard and the Ballard Railroad Bridge.

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The below photo shows a large ship passing under the Ballard Bridge on March 13, 1918.

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The below photo, taken on March 26, 1944. Features the Salmon Bay fishing fleet.

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Photo and information courtesy of Ballard Historical Society.

Throwback Thursday: The February Snow Storm of 1916

With it being the 100th anniversary of the huge February 2 snow storm of 1916, we thought we would take a look back at how Ballard fared that day.

Below is the torn image of the Ballard Ave street scene during the 1916 snow storm. Jeweler’s street clock can be seen on the left and Ballard City Hall and bell tower are in the background.

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Below is the view of the Junction Building and the Ballard commercial area street scene during the snow storm.

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Below is a postcard showing Ballard Ave. deep in the snow of the 1916 storm. A caption reads, “Record snowfall of 38 inches in Seattle, Wash. Feb 2 and 3 Ballard Ave. facing N.W.”

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Check out the KOMO News article to see more photos from around the city that were taken during the 1916 snow storm.

Photos and information courtesy of Ballard Historical Society.

Throwback Thursday: Sunset Hill back in the day

This week, we wanted to take a look back at some photos of Sunset Hill in times gone by. Have more photo? Email tips@myballard.com.

The below photo was taken outside Quality Market on Sunset Hill in 1935.
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The view from Sunset Hill Park (7531 34th Ave NW) in 1935. Sunset Hill Park was a gift to Ballard by Mr. and Mrs. Moomaw and Mr. and Mrs. Anderson in 1903.

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The below photo of Gilman Park Apartments at the bottom of Sunset Hill (address as seen in the photo as 1505 W 60th St) was taken in 1937. The building is still standing and currently houses Liberty Tax Services and Pasta Bella (pictured below).

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Photo and information courtesy of Ballard Historical Society and Seattle Parks and Recreation.

Throwback Thursday: Ballard restaurants of yesteryear

In recent years, Ballard’s restaurant scene has exploded. We wanted to take a look back and see what the restaurants of yesteryear had to offer.

Hans Nelson and his son Nels Nelson can be seen below outside their hotel, bar and restaurant on the corner of Dock Place and Ballard Ave in 1892.

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Below is a photo of “Jack’s Restaurant” taken in 1900 on Ballard Ave. It is not known the food that was served, however if you zoom in you may be able to decipher some menu items from the list on the right of the image.

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Ladies can be seen standing outside the Fern Café in the below photograph taken in 1925. Regular meals are listed as costing between 25 and 45 cents. The address can only be seen as 4833, which may belong to the address on Ballard Ave.

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Old Home Restaurant is featured in the below photograph taken in 1937. The restaurant was located at 5231 Ballard Ave where Hattie’s Hat currently stands.

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Photos and information courtesy of Ballard Historical Society.