CO detector in home

Home Forums Open forum CO detector in home

This topic contains 23 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  pennygirl 6 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 24 posts - 1 through 24 (of 24 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #62800

    gracie
    Participant

    Do you have one in your house – if not, get one now.(please). On home page here article about this morning couple & their dog rescued from home. Townhouse where car found running in garage. They were semi-conscious and are at hospital now.
    I remember some years back a townhouse by Taco Bell a girl was found dead – only to find out it was CO poisoning – same thing she left her car accidentally running.
    Some years back when I was with my boyfriend we had barbequed on a hibatchi. The packaging, I remember saying, “can barbeque inside.” So like dopes we left it in the kitchen, and later went to bed.
    Some hours later I woke up with the absolute worst headache I’ve ever had – felt like I could feel my brain hitting skull. My dog was passed out on the bed. Not thinking clearly, I took my dog outside. (I could barely walk) I don’t know why I thought should go outside but thankfully did. She came around & then I went oh my god, Jim. So I went in & had hard time waking him up and out of house.
    Doctor told us we were extremely lucky that I woke up because much longer and we would have been dead as well as my dog.
    So CO detectors are extremely important as well as your fire alarms. A few dollars could save your life maybe sometime in future.

    #62806

    Richy
    Participant

    Well, all non owner occupied single family homes are required by Wash State law to have one installed and operating as of Jan 2013 and all new homes. All owner occupied single family homes prior to 2009 are not required to have one until sold, but should have one. PSE will install / check / replace whenever there is a service call to a gas customer as will most repair agents.

    #62818

    Ernie
    Participant

    The packaging, I remember saying, “can barbeque inside.”

    That’s not too likely…

    #62819

    great idea
    Participant

    thank you for pointing that out Ernie.

    gracie spins many seemingly implausible yarns, but this one takes the cake.

    don’t get me wrong, I’m grateful for the public service announcement, but there’s no way the dog would be passed out yet, she would magically awake only to whisk the dog away (and then later remember the other human).

    how does someone accidentally leave their car running anyway?

    #62820

    Angeline
    Participant

    We have a detector now, and we also had a near miss years ago when our son was a baby. During regular maintenance inspection, we found out our oil furnace had been spewing out CO2 due to a cracked heat exchanger. Who knows how long? Luckily we hadn’t spent much time in the basement, we slept on the second story, and the house was old and drafty (oops, I mean well-ventilated).

    #62824

    Richy
    Participant

    GI, the story is on the front page here, and it is strange.

    Angeline, CO2 is not so bad, but off gas from cars, gas flames, oil flames are mostly CO. CO binds with the blood and will not allow O2 to combine – thus the NEED to go to the hospital and be put in a hyperbolic chamber.

    #62827

    Shelley
    Moderator

    I was really surprised a month or so ago that one of the CO alarms was chirping approximately every minute and couldn’t be silenced. “Oh, just the battery” I thought. Ha! I put in a new battery and it showed code “E09” and was still chirping. Googling showed it was the planned obsolescence code for the Kidde CO alarm which has an arbitrary 7-year life. Be aware of this when purchasing a CO alarm. Not necessarily a bad thing, but I’m not convinced there’s anything that actually wears out, or becomes less sensitive.

    #62828

    Angeline
    Participant

    Hahahahaha!! Thanks, Rich. Yes, the furnace was leaking CO. Too bad not CO2 — isn’t that what makes sodas fizzy? We could have had all the fountain drinks we wanted.

    #62832

    Richy
    Participant

    Shelley, yes it is an arbitrary 7yr life, but the detector uses CO chemical reaction to determine the amount of CO and this reaction causes the sensor to literally wear out (disintegrate) usually takes more then 7 years – but will last 7yr… so have it expire when it is known to be working, but before the mean time of total failure comes about.

    #62838

    gracie
    Participant

    GI and Ernie – really not important to me if you believe me or not. Like I’ve said before, I’m not sitting here thinking “hmm, what story can I make up now?” I have never fibbed, lied, embellished. And sorry GI if I have led a life with adventures. Actually I don’t apologize because there is nothing to apologize about.
    Hibachis were relatively new to the market here & it did say could barbeque inside. We should have known better..obviously. When researching later the company meant placing it in a fireplace. Still we should have known better.
    And for whatever reason I did wake up, I’m forever thankful. Maybe it should have told me something then when I thought of my dog first & boyfriend second. He turned out to be a very abusive (mental – not physical) boyfriend. But I survived that too and dumped his butt!
    And the cars running – the article on front page of My Ballard clearly says the car was found running. I, too, have wondered how you can leave a car running. Only that couple would know. And the article said they were found at top of stairs, semi-conscious. So they were “lucky” too although they didn’t quite make it out.

    #62904

    plasticbags
    Participant

    I’ve heard of people in colder climates warming up their cars in the garage before leaving in the morning. I suppose if something unexpected distracted you, it wouldn’t be that hard to forget you left it on.

    Also, sometimes people pull the grills or smokers back into their basements or garages before they are fully extinguished.

    It’s hard to jump to a judgement based on the information we know. I think it’s weird that the CO detector was going off, but they didn’t have enough time to get out. I wonder if they fiddled around with it thinking it was a false alarm? Perhaps when they come to, MB can follow up on the story. (Is that wishful thinking?)

    #62918

    Cate
    Participant

    It has been years, like when I was a girl, but yes there was a time when hibachi’s were encouraged (well, at least not discouraged) in the house. They were a new item back then in the United States and I guess it hadn’t been thought through completely. I can remember my parents using a hibachi in the house.

    #62925

    pennygirl
    Participant

    Ernie and GI – Google Indoor Hibachi.

    #62933

    gracie
    Participant

    Thank you Cate and Pennygirl

    #62937

    Ernie
    Participant

    You mean those electric hibachi grills? I’m not sure how that relates to this story.

    #62942

    Anonymous

    Ernie, are you using logic on myballard? You new here?

    #62945

    great idea
    Participant

    Ernie is the voice of reason, while me, he loyal sidekick, take the low road and still think gracie is living vicariously through a late-night drama she saw on Fox one rainy evening.

    “I wonder if they fiddled around with it thinking it was a false alarm? Perhaps when they come to, MB can follow up on the story. (Is that wishful thinking?)”

    perhaps the condo is seven years old, and the device was squawking that it’s life was over. I would disengage it myself.

    and yes, that is wishful thinking.

    #62952

    Curtis
    Participant

    Given the time of day, or night. I wondered if maybe they came home from a night out…might explain forgetting to turn off the car? Oh speculation and imagination! I’m turning into Gladys Cravitz!

    #62953

    great idea
    Participant

    that is not a bad guess, Curtis.

    I can’t imagine any truly logical scenario where someone in his right mind would turn on his car and then forget about it.

    CO deaths are always shocking events. I remember a few stories of kid sleep-overs that were near an offending furnace, as well as situations where the victims were immigrants that were not able to read hazard warnings for heating devices.

    #62954

    Cate
    Participant

    The CO alarm went off in Unit B but it was the residents of Unit A that left the car running. I’d be pretty darned ticked at my neighbors if I was the residents of Unit B.

    Edited to add: Amazon says you can use this inside to make your kids S’Mores. Uses charcoal, Sterno or candles(?). They actually had several they described as tabletop and suitable for indoors (but with charcoal for fuel!)
    http://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Rose-Mini-Hibachi-Grill/dp/B000GFBW6K

    #62957

    Curtis
    Participant

    Wow!
    That’s unconscionable.

    #62972

    pennygirl
    Participant

    Gracie said: “Hibachis were relatively new to the market here & it did say could barbeque inside. We should have known better..obviously. When researching later the company meant placing it in a fireplace.”

    This article says: “But what I like best is it fits in the fireplace, so you can grill in wet or cold weather indoors.”

    http://kk.org/cooltools/archives/1714

    Good enough?

    #62975

    great idea
    Participant

    that seems like a really awkward way to cook food.

    maybe in merry old England, where giant fireplaces abound in your castles, you’d have ample room to maneuver around the hibachi.

    most of the fireplaces I have seen in your Seattle bungalow or mid-century are small, tight little spots where you’d have a hard time flipping a burger.

    #62976

    pennygirl
    Participant

    Just pointing out that there is such a thing as a non-electric indoor Hibachi grill.

Viewing 24 posts - 1 through 24 (of 24 total)

The forum ‘Open forum’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Advertisement