Since you have helped with a vet..how about an Americanized Chinese restaurant

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This topic contains 27 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by  Jules 4 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 25 posts - 1 through 25 (of 28 total)
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  • #62928

    renit
    Participant

    When I was a kid and lived here there was the Teahouse on 85th street [yes, I am that old!] Was just Americanized Chinese food with crispy noodles under the chow mein and eggrolls, fried prawns. That sort of thing.Good but not true Chinese food.Most restaurants have gone to real Chinese food and I love that but once in awhile I like the old fashioned Americanized Chinese.The old Teahouse is now another Chinese place and it does not have very good reviews. The Rickshaw is still not very good, never was, they have not changed.Can’t eat there again. So is there any Chinese place that has that old American style Chinese food? I like crispy noodles and lots of veggies in my chow mein ,darn it!

    #62938

    Curtis
    Participant

    There’s a place up on Greenwood, across from Kens Market, I believe. Can’t place the name at all. Ate there once when we were house hunting (and wound up in Ballard!). It was fine but I guess I didn’t harbor the same love for the Chinese restaurant of my youth!

    #62941

    plasticbags
    Participant

    Magic Dragon does American-style Chinese food. It’s in Interbay in the Whole Foods plaza. They have premade things but they’ll make anything on the menu fresh if you ask. Friendly people.

    #62943

    Anonymous
    #62963

    Shelley
    Moderator

    The place Curtis refers to is no more. :(

    It was called Greenwood Mandarin I think.

    #62964

    Cate
    Participant

    racer – the menu for Chef at Wok lists Smoked Salmon Fried Rice (because the food world needs Norwegian-Chinese fusion!).

    #62969

    Novalis
    Participant

    Don’t get your title, op ?

    Please explain.

    Ok, saw the vet./ animal doctor post. nevermind

    Tai tung sp ? in international district ?

    Been awhile, is that still around, Sea Garden?

    #62974

    jburgh
    Participant

    Chef Liao on Phinney Ave

    Louies on 15th in Ballard

    #62980

    Nora Bell
    Participant

    The nephew loves Chef Liao. Louies is pretty good, huge hum bow! Good happy hour menu.

    #62981

    saffythepook
    Participant

    Outside of the Int’l district I’ve yet to find a Chinese restaurant that isn’t Americanized.

    #62994

    Avocado Head
    Participant

    Another vote for Chef Liao. We got delivery, and it was pretty good. The salt and pepper tofu was the surprising winner. It was pretty standard Americanized Chinese food, but well prepared and tasty.

    I know what you mean though about “Old School” Americanized Chinese food nostalgia… It used to be different! I remember as a kid in the late 70’s – early 80’s I LOVED the egg foo young served at the shopping mall food court, and still crave it from time to time. I’m sure any person from China would laugh if they could taste it (It was super weird, never had anything like it since) but in my youth this was “Chinese food” to me, haha…

    -Avo

    #63002

    briarrose
    Participant

    LOL salt and pepper tofu? I can’t think of a more americanized dish. GAG.

    #63003

    great idea
    Participant

    this thread makes me want to go to Golden City, order a few stiff drinks, and maybe throw-up on the Ping-Pong table.

    #63004

    KS
    Participant

    Louie’s is pretty old school Americanized Chinese.
    http://louiescuisine.com/Story.aspx

    #63007

    Avocado Head
    Participant

    Briarrose – LOL, hey, more for me. It is delicious. They have salt and pepper prawns, squid and pork too if that’s more up your alley.

    Tofu has been around in Asia for almost 2000 years before America was a thing. And the pepper component comes from the Szechuan (Sichuan) peppercorn, which has a funny numbing effect on the tongue, similar to cloves. I would say it’s probably less Americanized than most!

    -Avo

    #63008

    briarrose
    Participant

    Eat all the soy you want and enjoy but I have a hard with something that tastes like nothing and is really a marketing ploy by big agriculture.

    Learn the Truth About Soy. Just How Much Soy Do Asians Eat?
    ——————————————————————————–

    Just How Much Soy Did Asians Eat?

    In short, not that much, and contrary to what the industry may claim soy has never been a staple in Asia. A study of the history of soy use in Asia shows that the poor used it during times of extreme food shortage, and only then the soybeans were carefully prepared (e.g. by lengthy fermentation) to destroy the soy toxins. Yes, the Asians understood soy all right!

    Many vegetarians in the USA, and Europe and Australia would think nothing of consuming 8 ounces (about 220 grams) of tofu and a couple of glasses of soy milk per day, two or three times a week. But this is well in excess of what Asians typically consume; they generally use small portions of soy to complement their meal. It should also be noted that soy is not the main source of dietary protein and that a regime of calcium-set tofu and soymilk bears little resemblance to the soy consumed traditionally in Asia.

    Perhaps the best survey of what types/quantities of soy eaten in Asia comes from data from a validated, semi quantitative food frequency questionnaire that surveyed 1242 men and 3596 women who participated in an annual health check-up program in Takayama City, Japan. This survey identified that the soy products consumed were tofu (plain, fried, deep-fried, or dried), miso, fermented soybeans, soymilk, and boiled soybeans. The estimated amount of soy protein consumed from these sources was 8.00 ± 4.95 g/day for men and 6.88 ± 4.06 g/day for women (Nagata C, Takatsuka N, Kurisu Y, Shimizu H; J Nutr 1998, 128:209-13).

    According to KC Chang, editor of Food in Chinese Culture, the total caloric intake due to soy in the Chinese diet in the 1930’s was only 1.5%, compared with 65% for pork. For more information on the traditional use of soy products, contact the Price Pottenger Nutrition Foundation.

    The chief concern we have about the consumption of large amounts of soy is that there is a risk of mega-dosing on isoflavones. If soy consumers follow the advice of Protein Technologies International (manufacturers of isolated soy protein) and consume 100 grams of soy protein per day, their daily genistein intake could easily exceed 200 milligrams per day. This level of genistein intake should definitely be avoided. For comparison, it should be noted that Japanese males consume, on average, less than 10 milligrams of genistein per day (Fukutake M, Takahashi M, Ishida K, Kawamura H, Sugimura T, Wakabayashi K; Food Chem Toxicol 1996, 34:457-61).

    What about the traditional use of soy in infant feeding?

    Ever heard the industry line that ‘soy formulas must be safe because Asian infants have been eating soy for centuries’? Just another piece of false advertising, a little like the claims that ‘soy formulas are better than breast milk’ that many parents that have fed soy formulas testify to. And to set the record straight, soy was seldom used in infant feeding in Asia.

    Ernest Tso is credited with the development of the first soymilk diet that was able to sustain an infant for the first eight months of life. Writing in the Chinese Journal of Physiology in 1928, Tso noted that soybean milk is a native food used in certain parts of the country as a morning beverage but it is little used as part of the diet for children. Its nutritive properties as a food for young infants are practically unknown.

    Eight years later, Tso’s comments were still valid. Writing in the 1930’s, Dr RA Guy of the Department of Public Health of the Peiping Union Medical College found it ‘pertinent to note that we have never found soybean milk naturally used by Peiping women to feed their children. This beverage is not made in the home in Peiping, but is sold by street vendors, as a hot, very weak solution of soybean protein and is usually drunk by old people in place of tea. The milk, as reinforced for the feeding of young infants, is rather tedious and difficult to prepare. As dispensed recently by the various health stations, it is in demand, but is just as artificial in this community as cow’s milk’ (Guy RA. Chinese Med J. 1936; 50:434-442).

    In a later publication, Guy reported on the use of soybean milk as a food for infants. The whole purpose of this report was to comment on the possible use of soymilk to address the problem of feeding those infants without sufficient maternal milk in a country where cow’s milk was not native. He again noted that although a weak soy milk or ‘tofu chiang’ was ‘sold hot in Peking by street vendors and was taken by old people in place of tea’, that ‘contrary to Western notions’ it was not usual to feed soy milk to infants (Guy RA and Yeh KS. Chinese Med J. 1938; 54:1-30).

    It seems those same Western notions that made Asians out to be greater soy consumers than they were are still prevalent. Why is that? Asia is a huge market for the soy industry and the soy industry efforts to convince Asians that their ancestors ate much more soy than they actually did are purely profit driven. We view the attempts of the soy industry to re-write the history books with the contempt it deserves.

    #63010

    Avocado Head
    Participant

    I only eat soy based food maybe once a month or so. Mostly I eat veggies, grains, beans, etc. I accepted long ago that all advertising is profit driven and not to be trusted. But thanks for the cut-n-paste!

    #63011

    briarrose
    Participant

    Good idea Avacado. The whole ‘soy is good’ is basically the same as the garbage from the dairy industry. ” Milk is good food” Sure, if you are a baby cow.

    #63021

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Many vegetarians in the USA, and Europe and Australia would think nothing of consuming 8 ounces (about 220 grams) of tofu and a couple of glasses of soy milk per day, two or three times a week.

    Calling Dr. Straw Man! Dr. Straw Man to MyBallard! The premise of this article is that if you follow package directions on soy products, you might eat too much soy. I may not be a typical vegetarian, but I highly doubt that most vegetarians eat this quantity of soy. Vegans, maybe, although I’m suspect of that, too. Also, notice the strategic citing of scientific research in this paragraph:

    The chief concern we have about the consumption of large amounts of soy is that there is a risk of mega-dosing on isoflavones. If soy consumers follow the advice of Protein Technologies International (manufacturers of isolated soy protein) and consume 100 grams of soy protein per day, their daily genistein intake could easily exceed 200 milligrams per day. This level of genistein intake should definitely be avoided. For comparison, it should be noted that Japanese males consume, on average, less than 10 milligrams of genistein per day (Fukutake M, Takahashi M, Ishida K, Kawamura H, Sugimura T, Wakabayashi K; Food Chem Toxicol 1996, 34:457-61).

    So there’s a couple of problems here. One of them is whether you take the advice of the manufacturer about how much soy protein to eat. Funny thing, if you follow the chocolate chip package directions, you get cookies that some people think have too many chocolate chips. Crazy, right? So the basic idea is that following the package directions for a soy protein powder may lead to an unhealthy diet. The trickier one is that they use the paper cited at the end to identify the amount of genistein that Japanese men eat, but their contention that 200 mg/day “should be avoided” is completely unsupported.

    The bit about soy-based baby formula is also grossly misleading. I’m a firm advocate of breastfeeding, but I also don’t think formula is death in a can. They conflate modern soy based formula with feeding babies soy milk, which is an apples to kumquats comparison. The only source that they can cite of people suggesting that soy milk might be good for babies is a Chinese nutritionist from 1928 and an American from the 30’s. Back then, most Western nutritionists thought that beef, butter, and bread were the foundation of a healthful diet. Things change, right?

    B for effort, F for research. Sorry for the TL;DR.

    #63043

    renit
    Participant

    Saffythepook ,True, but there is Americanized and then there is the REALLY Americanized stuff. I am talking 1960’s 1970’s style .That stuff was so American I am surprised they got away with calling it Chinese.
    We tried the Chef at Wok..just not the right sort of food I am looking for.Good enough to eat though!
    Plasticbags ,I have never even set foot in a Whole Foods store. Guess I need to go check that out.

    Forgot about Louies have not been there in years. Will have to try that again.
    Will look into Chef Liao .I can check to see if they have an online menu.Pictures of the food helps.
    Novalis , The Seagarden ? I’ll look into that as well . Sorry my title was confusing. You can see I edited it a couple [ok three] times to try to make it understandable.Clearly I failed. I’ll try to do better next time.

    Great Idea, if the Golden City has those really stiff drinks it probably is a restaurant like I remember from my misspent youth. If I can get past the vomit on the pool table it could be a winner. :)
    Soy ..bleech.Soy is not real food is it?? :)
    Thank you again for the suggestions.

    #63062

    gracie
    Participant

    Avocadohead..if you like tofu, that’s all that matters. Some don’t like it..again theirr choice. There is a place in Columbia. Foodcourt that has good tofu. The seasoning is really good. I wouldn’t make my whole meal of that but as a side there, good taste.
    Louie’s I thought got bad reviews here before. Not my fav. Going to try Chef. Lio mentioned here.

    #63064

    Allison W
    Participant

    Didn’t like Chef Liao. There is a place on Aroura at about 87th (lu shen??) that is not bad.

    Anyone try Snappy Dragon in Maple Leaf?

    #63065

    Curtis
    Participant

    I love Judy Fu’s Snappy Dragon!
    I didn’t think of this place because I didn’t equate it with mid-century Chinese cuisine. The food is delicious, but not retro-delicious..

    #63066

    great idea
    Participant

    yeah, the snappy dragon is pretty good.

    someone gave me a few bottles of their sauces for x-mas and I loved them!

    #63067

    renit
    Participant

    Wow Curtis, you have made this food type sound so much classier by calling it “mid-century Chinese cuisine” and “retro-delicious” . Wish I would have thought it.
    Thank you for upgrading my food choice to something that nearly sounds edible. :)

    Allison, Aurora and 87th? I’ll look for that next time I drive by.I know there are a couple on around 97th and Aurora [have not checked into them yet] but have not noticed any at about 87th.

    I eat all sorts of Chinese. Will give the Snappy Dragon a try too!
    Thank you all for the suggestions.
    .

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