boatgeek

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Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 55 total)
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  • in reply to: nearby bicycle repair shop? #66711

    boatgeek
    Participant

    I’m a fan of Alpine Hut on 15th in Interbay.

    in reply to: Say NO to Prop 1 #65157

    boatgeek
    Participant

    As I understand it, the Seattle-only transit tax levy would work like this:

    * Seattle city government raises a bunch of money dedicated to bus routes
    * Seattle contracts with Metro to provide additional bus service within Seattle city limits using this money
    * Metro maintains this as a separate pool of money to fund specific routes and services

    This is apparently already happening on a small scale between Seattle and Metro, although I don’t know the specifics. One would hope that whatever agreement there is in place would have safeguards to keep Metro from cutting additional routes in Seattle from the overall Metro budget to fund routes elsewhere, then using the city money to put those routes back. That would use the Seattle-only tax money to subsidize routes out in the county. I would be especially hacked off if we ended up subsidizing routes anywhere that voted against Prop 1.

    I may well be wrong on how the Seattle-only levy works. If I am, please correct me!

    in reply to: Say NO to Prop 1 #64652

    boatgeek
    Participant

    King County asked the Legislature for the opportunity to vote on a means to make this a non-regressive tax. Apparently, it’s against conservative principles to be able to vote on public policy priorities, so the Senate wouldn’t do it (thanks, Rodney, hope you enjoy retirement!). Any attempt to fix the regressive tax system needs to start with the Legislature and will end with a public vote. That means either working for legislative campaigns in suburban districts and/or working on initiative campaigns. In the meantime, not making the system any worse would be a good thing.

    By the way, the editorial in the Times is internally inconsistent. Among other things, it complains about impacts on the poor, then suggests fare increases as a remedy. Other editorials against have focused on Metro’s farebox return numbers. Metro’s is infinitely higher than I-5’s farebox return, but nobody seems to worry about that.

    If you hadn’t figured it out by now, I say vote yes.


    boatgeek
    Participant

    I dunno, Mondo. Either way, the race organizers tried to reach out and got slapped in the face, with a cc to 300+ people. I can certainly understand bad feelings from last year, with streets closed for 4 hours longer than they should have been. He could have expressed that and a hope that this year would be different without being such a jackass. Even worse, it’s counterproductive. What incentive do the race organizers have to try to work with him now? No matter what they do, they can expect to get a slap for their efforts.

    But for someone who actively participates in the Syttende Mai parade to complain about street closures is pretty hypocritical. Plus, if a business can’t schedule around an afternoon/evening closure on a Saturday when given two months notice, I’m not sure they really belong in business.

    I know the maritime industry has special needs, especially near a season opening. I want the maritime industry to stay in Ballard, partly because that industry pays my mortgage. But I also don’t think that this should trump everybody else’s right to use the streets occasionally.


    boatgeek
    Participant

    Maybe I’m a “It’s not in my backyard” (INIMBY?) guy, but I don’t really see the issue with this. The marina is staying. The buildings to be torn down are currently office buildings, to be replaced with other, larger office buildings. Presumably, they could even build on current parking lot so that businesses could move from an existing building to a new one without even breaking stride. No industrial buildings are going to be displaced. If the land is zoned for maritime businesses (I forget the actual designation), Stimson would probably have to rent a certain percentage of the space to maritime people, so Trident and the other groups might well stay.

    Sure, there will be some parking impacts, but Stimson could even build a parking garage structure on the site if they wanted. Chances are, they could make a killing on $2 parking for Ballard Sunday Market.

    I could see the problem with SBSG going away, or Pacific Fishermen Shipyard (although the PFS general manager is such a jerk I wouldn’t cry too hard about that even). But office space turning into more office space, giving the neighborhood something to focus on besides condos and bars? Doesn’t seem so bad.

    in reply to: Car windshield replacement recs? #63708

    boatgeek
    Participant

    We used the place across 85th from Fred Meyer a few years ago for a side window on our minivan. They were pretty cheap, fast, and far less sketchy than the place looks from the outside. I don’t know if they have OEM glass.

    in reply to: Prop 1, April 22nd vote, what say you? #63613

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Definitely yes, since my daughter depends on Metro to get to high school.

    Mondo, I would be much more sympathetic to the plight of Eastern WA if there wasn’t such a direct correlation between counties that get more than they give and those that elect legislators who would gut state spending.


    boatgeek
    Participant

    Many vegetarians in the USA, and Europe and Australia would think nothing of consuming 8 ounces (about 220 grams) of tofu and a couple of glasses of soy milk per day, two or three times a week.

    Calling Dr. Straw Man! Dr. Straw Man to MyBallard! The premise of this article is that if you follow package directions on soy products, you might eat too much soy. I may not be a typical vegetarian, but I highly doubt that most vegetarians eat this quantity of soy. Vegans, maybe, although I’m suspect of that, too. Also, notice the strategic citing of scientific research in this paragraph:

    The chief concern we have about the consumption of large amounts of soy is that there is a risk of mega-dosing on isoflavones. If soy consumers follow the advice of Protein Technologies International (manufacturers of isolated soy protein) and consume 100 grams of soy protein per day, their daily genistein intake could easily exceed 200 milligrams per day. This level of genistein intake should definitely be avoided. For comparison, it should be noted that Japanese males consume, on average, less than 10 milligrams of genistein per day (Fukutake M, Takahashi M, Ishida K, Kawamura H, Sugimura T, Wakabayashi K; Food Chem Toxicol 1996, 34:457-61).

    So there’s a couple of problems here. One of them is whether you take the advice of the manufacturer about how much soy protein to eat. Funny thing, if you follow the chocolate chip package directions, you get cookies that some people think have too many chocolate chips. Crazy, right? So the basic idea is that following the package directions for a soy protein powder may lead to an unhealthy diet. The trickier one is that they use the paper cited at the end to identify the amount of genistein that Japanese men eat, but their contention that 200 mg/day “should be avoided” is completely unsupported.

    The bit about soy-based baby formula is also grossly misleading. I’m a firm advocate of breastfeeding, but I also don’t think formula is death in a can. They conflate modern soy based formula with feeding babies soy milk, which is an apples to kumquats comparison. The only source that they can cite of people suggesting that soy milk might be good for babies is a Chinese nutritionist from 1928 and an American from the 30’s. Back then, most Western nutritionists thought that beef, butter, and bread were the foundation of a healthful diet. Things change, right?

    B for effort, F for research. Sorry for the TL;DR.

    in reply to: Monday – SC prop to req licences and Ins. #62791

    boatgeek
    Participant

    RichY, you’re in violent agreement with me. Sure, require licenses for people who ride in serious traffic, and register all of the bikes. I don’t think that’s a huge deal, especially if there’s an exemption for people crossing major arterials in a crosswalk. I would like to see what insurance costs before saying it’s a blanket yes too.

    That said, I’m not sure that insurance is really solving the problem of people who knock down grandma. A lot of those incidents happen off arterials, including at least a few on multi-use trails. There was an incident in SF a year or two ago where a cyclist running a red light took out a pedestrian crossing with the light. I would think that the normal criminal justice system would be enough to deal with those relatively rare situations.

    in reply to: Monday – SC prop to req licences and Ins. #62758

    boatgeek
    Participant

    I don’t really have a problem with licensing and registering bikes and/or bicyclists that are on roads with speed limits over 35 mph, especially at the $5 fee that they were talking about in the law. Insurance is a different matter and a whole new level of cost.

    in reply to: Monday – SC prop to req licences and Ins. #62651

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Well, sort of. The bill as introduced applies to people 15 or over on a highway where the speed limit is at least 35 mph. I’m not sure if “highway” means any public street or a state/county highway. Also, it’s a bill that’s been introduced. It will be a lot more interesting as a precedent if it even gets a hearing, let alone passes.

    in reply to: Do You Depend On the Bus? #62268

    boatgeek
    Participant

    I’ll talk farebox return on Metro as soon as we get farebox return on I-5. I also disagree about usefulness of the One Bus Away app. I check that every morning for my daughter so she knows whether she has time to make the bus. Even at 6:45, the bus arrival time isn’t consistent enough to count on.

    As a transit system gets bigger, it theoretically gets more integrated and coordinates better. However, it also becomes less responsive to local needs. If we’re already having trouble getting Metro to respond to Ballard’s needs/desires, how much worse would it be to try to talk to a system that goes from Olympia to Everett?

    My Metro wish list?
    Focus capacity on demand. Eliminate suburban routes that don’t get much ridership.
    Increase east-west bus service in Seattle

    PS Tri-Met in Portland is just as much a government agency as Metro King County.

    in reply to: Good books you have read! #62216

    boatgeek
    Participant

    If you like mysteries, go for any of Laurie R. King’s Mary Russell series–Sherlock Holmes meets an apprentice years after retiring, then starts up on new adventures.

    I recently read an odd but good time-travel book, “Time and Again” by Jack Finney. It’s set in the late 60’s/early 70’s and then in the 1890’s. Kinda strange to read about computer output on cards.

    Currently reading a couple of David Sedaris books.

    in reply to: $15/hr? #61854

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Actually, a phase-in period for everyone makes a lot of sense. Maybe slightly longer for small biz. Many people (including some of the editorial staff at the Stranger) argue that a phase-in is needed. It should be on the table, and hopefully will once the actual legislation comes out. I hope that the $15 Now people will support passage of a $15 in a year or two bill and won’t try to stop it because it doesn’t meet all of their demands. I can see keeping the pressure on now until legislation is on the table.

    in reply to: $15/hr? #61853

    boatgeek
    Participant

    I think that including some kind of tip averaging and lower minimums for <18 year old workers (as are in the current min wage rules) would be reasonable, as would a longer phase-in period for small businesses. It would take some careful rule-writing to keep the Shelleys of the business world in the phase-in period and the McDonald’s out, but I’m sure it can be done.

    There are basically two ways that businesses will cope with minimum wage increases. They will either make up the difference in volume or in somewhat increased prices. Since labor is only a fraction of total costs, prices don’t have to go up nearly as much as the increase in the min wage. With more people with more money, most businesses will sell more (see Henry Ford). Most businesses will do a combination of the two approaches.

    Going down to Sea-Tac, the hotel owner that was whining up and down during the campaign that he would have to close up or make major adjustments if the min wage passed there is now expanding the hotel and will expand the workforce when it’s complete. Last time I parked at an airport lot, I had a $5 “living wage fee” tacked on to the $60 tab. I can live with that.

    The notion that higher pay or benefits kills jobs is wrong. Compared to the rest of WA, Seattle has the sick leave law and has better economic growth and lower employment. There was a study a few months ago about job changes in border counties between states with different minimum wages. They found no net change in retail or restaurant jobs. One of the people they interviewed was a guy who had a McDonald’s on the WA side of the street that is the border between WA and ID. When he expanded the restaurant a few years ago, he didn’t even think about moving across the border. If he had tried to pay ID minimum wages, he wouldn’t have had any workers, since they would have just driven past him into WA. Anecdotal evidence in that case was that the WA minimum wage went about half an hour’s drive into ID.

    in reply to: Police Search for Ballard Student #61360

    boatgeek
    Participant

    PG, I highly doubt that information is publicly available, and nor should it be. However, reporters also have their sources that get private data. I suppose it’s also possible that the police asked SPS for the student records, and it leaked out that direction. Either way, the SPS database seems like the most likely source for that particular piece of misinformation.

    in reply to: Fruit Tree Pruning Recommendation #61320

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Also, you can get pruning advice any time of year from the Miller Library Plant Answer Line (http://depts.washington.edu/hortlib/collections/pal.shtml), plus answers to any other garden questions you might have.

    in reply to: Easter Chocolate #61319

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Alert, thread drift! Some fine person brought a 5-lb Theo chocolate Santa to the New Year’s Eve party we went to. No chocolate baby Jesus though. Of course, if he was on Fox, he’d have to be a white chocolate baby Jesus.

    in reply to: Police Search for Ballard Student #61197

    boatgeek
    Participant

    The “homeless” thing may be a misunderstanding of how students are classed. In Seattle Schools, students that don’t live with their immediate family (or guardian) are considered homeless. That doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t have a roof, but they probably have a much more precarious living situation. Since there is a major academic impact every time a student moves, this makes some sense from SPS’ perspective.

    As I understand the news reports, the student wasn’t living with his family, so SPS would have considered him homeless. If the reporters got info out of the SPS database without understanding the odd definition (which wouldn’t be surprising), they may well have gotten the wrong info.

    in reply to: Shame on you #61120

    boatgeek
    Participant

    And the thong is the thong of love!

    (With bonus Leonard Nimoy)

    in reply to: Fruit Tree Pruning Recommendation #60912

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Gracie, Ciscoe Morris says that the best time to prune is when you have your pruners with you. In other words, better to prune at kind of the right time than not at all.

    The PlantAmnesty event will have better info, but in general, you can go by the following:

    Fruit trees: while the tree is dormant in the winter (November-ish until buds start swelling in the spring). Very vigorous trees (like Asian plums) can take another pruning in the summer after the fruit harvest.

    Lilacs: I’d go right after flowering to minimize the number of flowers you lose. It’s hard to hurt lilacs, so don’t worry too much about timing.

    Rhodies and other flowering shrubs: Defer to a Sunset book or another expert.

    in reply to: Doggie Drug Seizures – DEA raids doggy daycare #60866

    boatgeek
    Participant

    My co-worker lives up there and said her husband saw the bust going down. There were apparently about 10-12 marked and unmarked police cars in the yard and along the roadside. They boarded their dog there one winter. During the week they were gone, the place had a random fire. There were several unexplained “electrical fires” there over a few years. Definitely sketchy.

    EDIT: The dog day care people were allegedly selling heroin out of the same house as the day care. That’s not going to play well in Peoria.

    in reply to: OTBR – Learning to code #59977

    boatgeek
    Participant

    I’m pretty impressed with the craftsmanship the kids put into the rockets. They’re pretty well built. Technically, the only place you can legally launch rockets in King County is 60 Acres Park over in Redmond. I don’t think the cops bother if people are launching the little rockets, though. The high school clubs deal in bigger rockets, though. The national competition this year is to loft two raw eggs to 825 feet and land them between 48 and 50 seconds after liftoff. That takes a rocket about 2-3 feet long. The Ingraham club also has a high power launch at a statewide launch party in Eastern Washington in May, where they’ll send up an 8-foot rocket to about a mile just for fun. That launch site has FAA clearance to 14,000 feet, so people attending bring big rockets that can be pretty exciting.

    in reply to: Fruit Tree Pruning Recommendation #59948

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Many tree service companies aren’t very good at pruning. Seattle Tilth can give you some recommendations for arborists who know their stuff around fruit trees. (Seattletilth.org)

    in reply to: OTBR – Learning to code #59932

    boatgeek
    Participant

    Mondo, my understanding was that while there is a certain amount of remote control, the robotics teams also use a moderate amount of Java programming to automate some steps. A couple of years ago, the goal was to create a robot that could shoot baskets. I believe some teams automated the process of loading a basketball from the floor into the robot for shooting so that they only had to push one button.

    All that said, my kid is in rocketry, so I may have the wrong idea.

Viewing 25 posts - 26 through 50 (of 55 total)
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