City releases 2009 crime stats

It may not come as much of a surprise that the Seattle Police Department’s year-end crime stats, released this week, show a slight rise in crime in 2009 when compared to 2008; back in December the FBI released national crime stats that uncovered the same upswing trend here in Seattle.

Based on SPD data, violent crimes went up 12 percent in 2009 from 2008, while property crimes rose 7 percent. Although this may seem like a significant increase, the FBI report comparing violent crimes in the first halves of both 2008 and 2009 in Seattle, indicated a much larger increase of 22 percent.

Though these numbers may be startling, to give some perspective, SPD also compared the 2009 stats to all of the final major crime numbers over the last decade. SPD wrote on their website,

One final note on the 2009 Major Crime trends is apparent when they are viewed not only in comparison with 2008, but also in light of the trends over a period of years. The table below presents a ten-year picture of Major Crimes in Seattle. In the last two rows, the ten-year average for each crime category is shown as well as the comparison of the 2009 figures to this average.

As the table demonstrates, the Major Crime totals for 2009 are below the ten-year averages in all crimes, except robbery.

So there you have it. Though the stats show assaults, larceny and burglary are also up compared to 2008, robbery is the only crime that has risen above average over the last ten years. Read more on recent and past SPD crime statistics here and here.

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onederfullone
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onederfullone

Perhaps we can move past the debate about crime statistics now?

Name
Guest
Name

Nah – the apologists will still be out in force chanting, “it's just a perception of more crime now, because of the internet, we hear about the crimes all the time….don't worry, be happy, everything's great!”

Oh, yeah, and my other favorite excuses: 1) hey, this is nothing – it's not nearly as bad as <insert the place they came here from>, and 2) it's all part of living in a city, so get used to it and STFU whiners – just finished the missing link and all crime will disappear!”

Morons…

blueben
Guest
blueben

Wasn't really much to debate. We already know that crime goes up during hard economic times. Pretty much everything from robbery to domestic abuse. And these are definitely hard economic times.

blueben
Guest
blueben

Was this nasty, divisive, hateful, and ignorant comment really necessary?

Nathan
Guest
Nathan

Thats actually not true. Crime has goes down in this economic time in cities that practice proper policing and incarceration.

Ernie
Member
Ernie

“Major Crime totals for 2009 are below the ten-year averages in all crimes, except robbery.”

Crime is down compared to the 10 year average, so why don't you STFU.

Moron….

blueben
Guest
blueben

Sources? I'm curious to see that.

Nathan
Guest
Nathan
onederfullone
Guest
onederfullone

Yet another common misconception spread by the ignorant.
Crime has reduced nationally, even in this economy. The exception, the Seattle Tacoma areas. Why is now the debate, keep up, will you?
Blaming the economy is the farce the hug a thugs embrace. A closer look at the catagories shows a huge increase in recitivism. That is the difference.
It is also interesting how that is never an issue in this discussion. Why?

blueben
Guest
blueben

Very interesting. That warrants more research.

blueben
Guest
blueben

Are you always so bitter, negative, and unnecessarily hostile?

onederfullone
Guest
onederfullone

Are you always this hyper-reactive to the truth?
Sorry, stupid question.

Idle Activist
Guest
Idle Activist

More denial you mean….

Gurple
Member

I don't know which is the bigger pile of crap: that right-wing WSJ article, or your weird interpretation about 'proper policing and incarceration'. Consider the opening lines of the article:

“The recession of 2008-09 has undercut one of the most destructive social theories that came out of the 1960s: the idea that the root cause of crime lies in income inequality and social injustice.”

Gee. Do you think the author had a bit of a bias going in? She works for The Manhattan Institute, a free-market think-tank!

Here's another view:
http://articles.latimes.com/2009/jan/08/opinion
It's just not so simple.

Nathan
Guest
Nathan

From YOUR article:

“The role of the police in reducing crime is often overlooked by those preoccupied with the jobs-crime link. The sharp decline in crime in New York — and now in Los Angeles — has a lot to do with how those police departments changed.

Over the last several decades, New York has experienced the country's largest decline in crime since we began keeping records. The reasons are not fully understood but include a 33% increase in the size of the New York Police Department, an excellent computerized system for tracking crime (Compstat), a management style that made precinct commanders fully accountable for managing crime in their districts and an aggressive policy of searching people on the streets for guns”

Idle Activist
Guest
Idle Activist

Apparently not from the sub-title:

“If you think a down economy causes crime to rise, think again. “

onederfullone
Guest
onederfullone

In a nutshell 'zero tollerance' from petty to major crime. It must be a coincidence tho, need more research…

blueben
Guest
blueben

When someone unequivocally declares that they are the source of truth, they're actually usually the source of crap.

Gurple
Member

Yes? Yes! That is a quote! Good cut-paste skills!

I'm not denying that better policing reduces crime. More police, more efficient police -> less crime. Agreed!

The WSJ article was saying pretty strongly that the bad economy was actually /lowering/ crime, and that, therefore, the whole concept of a tie between economic disparity and crime was flawed.

That WSJ article is a steaming pile of wishful conservative thinking that /downplays/ the effect of improved policing on lowering crime.

Nathan
Guest
Nathan

@gurple

you have some serious reading comprehension problems if you think the WSJ article was claiming that lower crime was a result of a bad economy.

it was simply usining facts to disput the myth the a high crime in a bad economy is inevitable.

it was proving that good policing can reduce crime DESPITE the economic hardship, something that the myth claimed was impossible.

its funny that youve attacked the article, and indirectly me, so vehemently, yet post a link to an editorial that is essentially making the same exact argument.

Gurple
Member

@Nathan:

You got me, I was overstating the WSJ article's stupidity for effect, and that was hardly necessary. Here, to my mind, is the crux of the WSJ article, and the single dumbest thing about it:

“And by the end of 2009, the purported association between economic hardship and crime was in shambles.”

The author takes some data that shows that, in some places, improved policing has lowered crime. From those data she infers that there is no association between crime and the economy.

Do you see the hole in her logic? Do you see why I say that the article is ideologically driven?

cdpenne
Member
cdpenne

Extremely interesting articles. I can see how the first has more of an ideological agenda than the second- the second ended with a question. But I enjoyed reading both. I think the point is the same and we mostly all agree, whether the economy or whatever is to blame, only one thing will improve the situation- more effective policing. It was interesting to read that the LA police chief was able to get results without the addtional funding. Maybe there is hop for us yet.

SPG
Guest
SPG

Hey bb, weren't you the one with the crime isn't so bad mantra?

blueben
Guest
blueben

Against crime histrionics? Absolutely. I still am. Crime is up a little bit, but we are still statistically safer today than we have been for much of the past 30 years. Our neighborhood is still a great place to live.

Lock your doors when you leave. Take reasonable precautions. Pay your insurance. Keep in touch with your neighbors. Do these things, and there's no need to be hysterical about crime.

SPG
Guest
SPG

Good point. I don't think we need to get hysterical about it and become a bunch of paranoid shut ins, but the level of property crime around here is way too high. And it doesn't have to be that way. I think that's what gets me pissed off about it and harping on the crime issue.