Coffee chat with Carlyle in Ballard

Thursday morning, 36th District Rep. Reuven Carlyle wants to hear what’s important to you. “I’m making an effort to reach out to the 130,000 people of our community to discuss issues, ideas, concerns and problems that need attention,” he tells us. Hot-button topics such as the budget, the deep-bore tunnel, education, Metro funding, jobs, health care, housing, or human services, Rep. Carlyle is open for conversation.

He’ll be at the Caffé Fiore at 5405 Leary Ave NW from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. “Now is the time to review the tough budget issues facing Washington and to look toward 2010 for ideas for new legislation to help families in today’s difficult times,” Carlyle says.

Update: If you can’t make it to Thursday’s chat, Rep. Carlyle will be hosting a “Market Meetup” on Aug. 30th from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Ballard Farmers Market. We’ll have more details as we get closer to that date.
(Disclosure: Reuven Carlyle is a sponsor of MyBallard.)

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chopper_74
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chopper_74

Thank you sir, the last budget session did nothing but forward the fiscal pain facing this region, in fact, it added to the pain.I certainly hope that the issue is addressed more responsibly in 2010. I'd suggest an absolute freeze on new spending, and on any budget increases state-wide. I'd go as far as to repeal planned projects that don't meet the basic needs of the community.
The first rule of getting out of the hole, stop digging.

royhobbs
Guest
royhobbs

It would be nice if this weren't being held at a time when most of us were at work. That said, I'd love to hear his comments about the march toward installing a state income tax, especially in light of the fact that Oregon, which has no sales tax, is thinking of adding one, because “the income tax has too much variation due to the economy”.

As you know, one of the primary arguments for the income tax side of the argument has been that the sales tax is too sensitive to changes in the economy.

NoraBell
Guest
NoraBell

I can't go so I'll have to say it here: Metro funding please! Light rail is lovely but it seems silly as city buses are so underfunded right now.

Bangoskank
Guest
Bangoskank

“The first rule of getting out of the hole, stop digging.” I love the appropriateness of that comment. I couldn't agree more!

I too will be at work, someone get in there with a camcorder!

LIVE FEED GO!

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

Cost way less, more flexible (understatement of the century there) and has ridership that will NEVER be matched by light rail. I know it seems obvious, but for some reason (big money a-holes) we get light rail anyway.
So, yeah, strong agreement w/ NoraBell. And we need it yesterday!

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

I'll be there, have a camcorder to lend?

blueben
Guest
blueben

I agree and disagree. We need more improvement to our metro, but we also need the light rail. There is no reasonable way to travel long distances on nearly any bus route. Try taking a bus from Ballard to Tacoma, or Redmond, or Everett, or the airport. It's a miserable nightmare of time and transfers. Adding more bus routes may help, but so does adding some light rail to connect neighborhoods and cities. Hub and spoke transportation has been extremely effective in numerous cities for over 100 years now, and there's no reason we can't use it to make travel in our region more efficient.

As it stands today, I won't take a job in Everett, Tacoma, or most parts of the east side because I would necessarily have to commute by car. If light rail connected all of these areas, this wouldn't be a problem.

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

Buses can go long distances, on designated routes, connecting cities. Heard of Greyhound, I assume? Rail is the worst expense for the least benefit.

SPG
Guest
SPG

Wait, I thought you just said we should freeze all spending? Now we can spend, since it's something you want. That's the problem with blanket policies that sound great when you say them “Freeze all new spending!” until you realize that there's something crucial that you have to spend on, even when it often will head off catastrophe and save exponentially more money down the road.
How about less ideology and more reality? Fewer chants, folksy sayings, and ole country idioms, and more reality based policy focused on results.

NoraBell
Guest
NoraBell

With the current transportation budget we can't have both, though I agree we need both. I just don't think it was good timing.
And the Sounder train already went to Tacoma, didn't it?

59thandBlake
Guest
59thandBlake

What a convenient time to have a chat. Here's a thought… maybe have one when your constituants are off work? 6pm-8pm? Just a thought.

SPG
Guest
SPG

Not true by a long shot.
Travel anywhere in Europe or Japan? Rail gets you there faster, cheaper, and easier than by car or bus.
Try to get anywhere in New York City? The subways are the way to go while the buses are stuck in traffic along with the cars.
I know that this is not NYC, EU or Japan, but a rail system has a lot of benefits. It is a known route that doesn't have to deal with (as much) traffic. It encourages density around the stations and allows people to plan and build around known infrastructure. Trains can carry far more passengers. And a lot of people who would never take the bus will have no problem getting on a train.

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

ah, that's a bit dismissive SPG.
I do believe in folksy sayings, sorry…
Totally serious about the spending freeze.
(That means no increase in spending, btw)
Use the existing budget better.
Like buses instead of boondoggles, for starters.
Like private liquor sales instead of public.
Like private art instead of public art.
I could, and should go on, but I need to work, eventually.

mickey
Guest
mickey

Absolutely agree. Having lived in two cities with rail systems, I think denying the benefits and the need of light rail just seems counter-intuitive — if not counter-productive . Yes, we need to stop cutting funds for Metro, though, in reality, Metro, has never fully paid for itself either. Maybe taking away Metro hours in order to fund Paul Allen's 1.2 mile little shuttle wasn't such a good idea… As for my biggest gripe with the legisature… please STOP cutting people from the Basic Health Plan. Health care is the most important issue, IMO, and we are already seeing drastic cuts to King County Public Health as well. Denying people care, especially if it involves communicable diseases like flu and TB, is inhumane and dangerous. Instead of contributing to the crisis in public health and low-income health care, please re-examine the priorities. Of course, we could start funding both transportation and health care if the legislature had the courage and foresight to rescind many of the 500+ tax deferrals and exemptions — some of which serve to benefit only ONE company (which is unconstitutional to begin with). The same company that squeezed us for $3.2 billion, plus another $45 million… Read more »

steve_k
Guest
steve_k

Someone print this feed and drop it off at the cafe.

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

As long as they redact my nonsense… ;-)

NoraBell
Guest
NoraBell

I'm not sure how private art would work, but private liquor sales are a must now.

AD
Guest
AD

The problem with buses is that they sit in traffic with cars. Light rail with its own right-of-way is the best solution.

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

Like it always has NoraBell.
Unfortunately, it doesn't tend to be ugly and controversial, but I could get over that…
I'd rather the rich and influential folks in town raise millions for art, than millions for politicians…
oh, yeah, sorry sir.

NoraBell
Guest
NoraBell

It depends on where they're going to take it. Light rail can't go everywhere. If I need to get to the airport it's a great solution but if I need to meet my mom for breakfast in Greenwood it's useless to me. Metro gets me to Greenwood, eventually. Not everyone works and plays downtown. Again, I'm all for light rail but rail has limitations and leaves a gap that Metro needs to fill.

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

“It's own right-of-way”, that's the kicker, and where all the influential take over. Be prepared to give up your house.
(Alarmist? I beg to differ)
The problem is cars are sitting, trucks are sitting, buses are sitting. And, they are in their 'right-of-way'. We have already payed for that right-of-way, folks. Although, they keep looking to make us pay for it over and over and over. The billions invested so far in light rail won't/can't address that.
Trillions later, you don't have a car, or you have to leave it in your backyard. (if you have a backyard, or any yard)
Yeah, that's progress.

mickey
Guest
mickey

When I worked in D.C. in 1980, the Metro (light rail) was just being built. I had to take a bus from my house in Alexandria, Virginia to National Airport and then hop on the train from there to downtown. It was a bit of a hassle but the light rail portion of the ride was worth it. Very fast, clean and it had air conditioning in the summer! Now their rail system goes all over the place. It's fantastic. That's the way it works with every rail system: it starts with one line and expands over time to cover the entire city. The Boston T is another great system. And it works along side the bus system there, which is also very good. Any city with a growing population and work force, like ours, must have both rail and buses to make commutes possible for people who don't (or can't) drive or bike. I do take the bus in Seattle, but it is a drag. For one thing, the buses stink. For another, many of them do have to sit in traffic (trolleys). I keep hearing people ask about how to make Seattle a “world class city”. Having a… Read more »

squid
Member

We just added an update – If you can’t make it to Thursday’s chat, Rep. Carlyle will be hosting a “Market Meetup” on Aug. 30th from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Ballard Farmers Market. We’ll have more details as we get closer to that date.

chopper_74
Guest
chopper_74

Mr. Reuven Carlyle, thank you for the courage required to be accessible to your constituents. You have been solid in that regard, since day one.
Thank you for extending the opportunity to discuss serious issues, and for adding the additional opportunity for the Ballard Farmers Market meet-up as well. I plan to attend both, I hope I can.

Thank you Geeky Swedes, as always, this resource is priceless.

AD
Guest
AD

NoraBell – Of course light rail won't ever replace the need for buses. But buses don't come close to the speed and convenience of light rail.

chopper_74 – Give me a break! Light rail is usually built below existing roads, above existing roads, or along existing public rights-of-way. In some cases it may be necessary to take private property, but that's true for any transportation project. How much private property was taken to build I-5 and I-90? Light rail will have a much smaller impact than that.

Adding buses (or light rail for that matter) to jam packed roads and freeways will not result in more efficient transportation. Light rail needs to be separate from existing 'rights-of-way' otherwise it's not worth building.

We've spent billions and trillions of dollars on our state and federal highway systems, why is investing in other modes of transportation such a problem? Light rail is actually a more efficient use of our money than highways.

You've obviously never experienced what it is like to commute on a first-rate transportation system, because we don't have one here.

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