Despite Missing Link setbacks, Ballard Multimodal project underway

Even though plans for the Missing Link hit a major setback last year, the city has chosen to go ahead and start construction on part of the Burke-Gilman’s missing section of the trail.

It’s called the Ballard Multimodal Corridor — a clever rebranding of the Missing Link — and is starting with work along NW Market St between the Ballard Locks and 24th Ave NW.

The Seattle Department of Transportation has started with utility verification work for the new transit poles and signal improvements, which is causing temporary lane closures on NW Market St and NW 54th St for exploratory excavations.

Crews will be digging holes about 3 feet by 10 feet deep as they confirm underground utility locations and determine where to install Metro transit poles and and SDOT signal poles. SDOT says Metro will establish temporary bus stops during the construction.

Other work included in the scope of the Multimodal project will include new pavement on some roadways, driveway enhancements, new signals, new utility and drainage infrastructure, and enhanced pedestrian infrastructure. One of the main concerns with the Shilshole corridor has been the impact to local industry along that stretch.

“Design of the Ballard Multimodal Corridor improvements recognize the importance of Ballard’s manufacturing and industrial community and will maintain truck and freight access to the industrial and water-dependent businesses adjacent to the corridor,” SDOT says in their project website.

In response to the most recent setback in King County Court, SDOT is required to perform additional analysis of the potential economic impact to businesses along the corridor. Their review is underway they expect to finish this spring.

To learn more about the project and its timeline, visit SDOT’s website.

Thanks to Ballard District Council for providing photos!


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Insanity
Member
Insanity

“In response to the most recent setback in King County Court, SDOT is required to perform additional analysis of the potential economic impact to businesses along the corridor. Their review is underway they expect to finish this spring.”

As if SDOT and SCC is listening to any of the businesses concerns.

NA
Member
NA

Those businesses don’t own the street – the city does and they can and should do what they want with it. After all these shenanigans the businesses have caused on that street I want nothing more for them to go all out of business.

Insanity
Member
Insanity

And all the living wage jobs to go with them, you should run for SCC moron.

NA
Member
NA

The businesses don’t own the street. We do. End of story.

multimodal
Member
multimodal

Thank you SDOT! Glad you changed the name to reflect all the improvements being made.

VeganBiker
Member
VeganBiker

YES! Finally we are going to get part of the Missing Link completed!

Uncle Buck
Guest
Uncle Buck

Ah good.
The city dreamed up an intersectional, postmodern sounding name for it’s new intersection-and business-blocking project. Does “intermodal” mean “junkie tent camps”?

I hope we can get more trash and criminals along the stretch behind the Fred Meyer.

multimodal
Member
multimodal

“This will be easier on a bike trail.”
– 5 year old crossing Market & 30th with his bike, mother and grandmother yesterday afternoon.