City won’t appeal ‘Missing Link’ ruling

The City of Seattle made it official this morning, deciding not to appeal a judge’s ruling on the missing link of the Burke-Gilman Trail. Instead, the city will follow this judge’s order to conduct an environmental review of a small section of the missing link that was left out of the original study. SDOT tells us the review on Shilshole Avenue from 17th Ave. to Vernon Place will take about six months.

A group of businesses fighting the proposed missing link lost in court on 8 of the 9 issues that went before the judge. Once this environmental review is complete, the group can still appeal those 8 issues. Attorneys for the businesses tell MyBallard they haven’t decided what steps to take, but they continue to push for an alternative “cycletrack” through downtown Ballard.


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eddiek
Member
eddiek

We are still waiting for the Ballard Chamber of Commerce to state on their website and issue a press release that they will not appeal the latest ruling concerning the missing link. If they do we can begin to move forward as a community, build a safe path, and end the boycott of all Chamber of Commerce business members.

bbb1
Guest
bbb1

Well, the desired outcome seems to have been achieved – further delay. That's the way it goes, and the process remains mired in legal challenges. You got to live by the rules…. A plea to those businesses that continue to fight this effort through available legal challenges – let's spend some of that money on further implementing safety features for the trail, even beyond what the City's design has built in – if safety is truly the issue, then let's make it even more safe. Don't waste your money and our money (taxpayer money funds further analysis, and the fight against legal challenges of course) continuing to challenge something that has now been vetted and debated and designed, and has stood up to environmental challenges x2. As for a cycle track, I suspect we'll see these same businesses offering to spend … ?$50k? of their money to study this. We should be doing everything we can to make biking and walking safe, of course, but a cycle track is not what we Ballardians want – we want to keep creating contiguous sections of multi-use trail, as has been designed. To paraphrase, the current design is safe, simple, and it's connected.… Read more »

motorrad
Member
motorrad

I really hope this backfires on sb$g and ballard oil. By the City's actions I am hoping that the environmental review of the missing link will enable them to build the trail along shilshole for it's entirety without the stupid detour. That would be justice.

For residents against the bikers and trail, you do realize the cycletrack the businesses propose would essentially make Laery and Market one lane each direction. YOu are being duped.

John
Guest
John

Seattle, get over yourself!! Nowhere else have I seen so much complaints, fighting, debating, lawsuits, et al in the name of conservation, neighborhood character, preservation, and so forth to the point of impeding PROGRESS. If it weren't for these character flaws, Seattle for sure would be far more progressive and more of a LEADER of all the major cities of similar size on the west coast.

Businesses along Shilshole: You know change is coming. The area is no longer an industrial playground it used to be. If further change doesn't happen soon, it sure will in the coming years (or the next economic growth cycle). You're just trying to delay the inevitable.

City: Learn from SF or NYC and just f*ing get sh*t done! I'm sick of paying taxes and have no results but only have more consultants and lawyers hired to weigh more options so you can scratch your head and/or belly to wonder what to do.

bbo
Guest
bbo

John:

I am certain you are very important, and I am not meaning to diminish your importance to the tax base, but the fishing industry and those industrial businesses in that area contribute an incredible percentage of the City's tax base. Don't be myopic folks!

Val
Guest
Val

What? You're crazy. Boycotting local businesses is a ridiculous way to go about accomplishing anything.

nancyfancy
Guest
nancyfancy

Exactly what is that percentage and by all means, cite your sources please.

Val
Guest
Val

I'm sorry, John, but how much do you and your fellow biking hobbyists contribute to the local economy and tax base, compared to the LOCAL BUSINESSES you just demeaned? Face it: Bikes are not meant to go everywhere. The next thing you know, you and your fellow radical activists will be petitioning to dredge the Ship Canal because it is too wet. GET OVER YOURSELF!!!

Val
Guest
Val

4.6%

asdf
Guest
asdf

Indeed.

John, those businesses that you dismiss as standing in the way of “progress' were here long before you and your pals moved here. If you didn't want to live in a neighborhood that had a few businesses left in between all the bars and condos, then you shouldn't have moved to Ballard.

Go back to NYC where, as you say, they “just f*ing get sh*t done”. I'm sure you will fit in much better there with all the Important People than you do with the unsophisticated rubes who made Ballard what it was before you and you buddies showed up and decided to transform it into something cool enough for you.

nancyfancy
Guest
nancyfancy

source please, I'm curious…

Gurple
Member

6 months, eh? And /then/ the plaintiffs have a chance to appeal?

I hope they manage to break ground in 2011.

Corbeau
Member
Corbeau

“I'm sorry, John, but how much do you and your fellow biking hobbyists contribute to the local economy and tax base, compared to the LOCAL BUSINESSES you just demeaned?” Probably more than you! Keep in mind the average cyclist also owns a car. That means they pay taxes on their car AND their bike. In my household the combined (and taxed) purchase price of our car, truck and 4 bikes is over $80k. Did you pay more than that for your vehicle? No? Then stop whining about cyclists not paying their fair share of taxes! On top of that cyclists on the whole tend to have higher incomes than non-cyclists which means we spend more at local businesses and pay more in taxes. As for cyclists and local businesses, ever hear of a local company called Starbucks? They're run by an avid cyclist and last I checked they paid a LOT more in taxes than any company in Ballard. I also know that the CEOs of REI and Redfin are active cyclists as is the head of X-Box over at Microsoft. I long ago lost track of how many doctors I know who are cyclists. For better or for worse,… Read more »

Corbeau
Member
Corbeau

PS – I am against the plan to run the bike path up Shilshole. Given the traffic on that street it makes more sense to go up Ballard Ave. I ride and I avoid Shilshole at all costs.

Beth
Guest
Beth

This is all SO Seattle!

HeatherHeather
Guest
HeatherHeather

hear here! Ballard Ave is the answer!

BallardDINK
Guest
BallardDINK

Hmm… there might be something to that. What if all of Ballard Ave were pedestrian/bike?

John
Guest
John

Exactly the type of replies I expected… Note that I did not advocate FOR or AGAINST the BIKE trail in my post. Personally I don't like the idea of adding the bike trail along Shilshole as the road needs more lanes first (and the railroad needs to go). The intersection at Market & Shilshole is terrible.

I suppose I could've made my comment more clear, however. I meant PROGRESS as in the growth & development of Ballard, whether it be retail, commercial, service, or residential. Inevitably, the commercial lease rates will go up and old school businesses will be forced to relocate elsewhere where rents are cheaper. What was once an engine shop, for example, may turn into another bar, restaurant, or be entirely demolished for another mixed condo/retail building. These are market forces at work, people! Get used to it. It happened in many cities across the country and it will happen here sooner or later, it's just a matter of when.

SPG
Guest
SPG

Obstructing the completion of the trail is a ridiculous way to go about as well.
I've stopped doing business with Salmon Bay Sand and Gravel over this, and I'm now at the point where a boycott of the Chamber members isn't out of the question anymore.

SPG
Guest
SPG

…but the bike path would separate the bikes, pedestrians, joggers, strollers, etc FROM the traffic. Going up Ballard would make the bikes have to cross Shilshole twice, and then ride with and through any traffic on Ballard Ave while avoiding getting doored. It's much more dangerous to run the path on Ballard Ave than building the separated path on Shilshole.

SPG
Guest
SPG

Right now those industrial businesses are receiving a de facto subsidy in that they are zoned Industrial only. Once that changes and the landlords can rent them for the real market rate, those industries will be forced to move.
That's the real battle that the industries will need to fight and the way they're acting now they'll have few friends in the neighborhood willing to stand with them. If anything I'm going to start actively agitating to rezone that entire area as mixed Industrial/commercial/residential.

SPG
Guest
SPG

I loves me a pedestrian mall as much as anyone, but I don't think that it's a viable alternative for the other six days a week. It's great occasionally, like festivals and farmers markets, but during the week people still like to park to “run in” to their store.

kurisu
Guest
kurisu

It wouldn't be on Shilshole, it would be on what is now gravel next to Shilshole and separated from traffic

kurisu
Guest
kurisu

I think it's only 6 months if they wind up doing an EIS. If they go through the checklist and nothing stands out (likely) they may be able to move ahead much sooner.

Corbeau
Member
Corbeau

True except you have all the trucks/cars coming out of the businesses on Shilshole. You know they'll pull out and block the path, possibly without looking first and hitting someone. It's similar to the separated bike path along Alaskan Way which is a nightmare to ride on compared to riding on Alaskan itself.

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