Virtual public meetings to discuss future of Ballard-Interbay transit

This week, transportation officials will be hosting the first of two virtual meetings to look at the future of transit in Ballard and Interbay.

The study is known as BIRT (Ballard-Interbay Regional Transportation), developed in response to the Washington State Legislature’s request for SDOT to look at ways to improve travel for people and goods in Ballard and Interbay. The project area includes NW Market Street to the north, Pier 91 and the Expedia campus to the south, 10th Avenue West to the east, and 28th Avenue West to the west (see map below).

The first meeting will be on Wed., July 29 from 12 noon to 1pm and will include a live presentation that will outline potential projects based on a 20-year forecast for transportation needs in Ballard and Interbay. The meeting can be watched live, and those watching can submit questions for the presenters.

If you can’t watch live, a recording of the meeting will be posted on SDOT’s website. There will be a second meeting with the same content on Thurs., August 6 from 6:30 to 7:45pm.

SDOT has also created an online survey (live until Aug. 10) and interactive map that will allow you to review the draft projects and provide comments.


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Paintking
Member
Paintking

With the money this city, county and state takes in, they should give us all a shiny new Benzo. Done. Then, after that, build a damn new bridge. Talk talk talk. Paralysis by analysis BS. Stalling just raises costs. Build it, they’ve already come.

Newton
Member
Newton

We voted for a monorail. But the mayor killed it because it didn’t involve enough pork.

Newton
Member
Newton

My point being, the city doesn’t even respect a vote. They are not going to care jack squat about our “input”. In fact, the meetings are likely designed to help them plan their “spin” when they do exactly what they want and make Ballard fully unlivable.

Truth
Member
Truth

You should do a bit of research on the Seattle Monorail Project before hurling some “zingers” to fit your narrative.

Voters ultimately killed the project in 2005 after the City threatened to withhold funding and City ROW when costs kept ballooning out of control with no construction in sight. Because the voters had four times voted in favor of the project, the City wanted voters to have the final say and the fifth measure was heavily in favor of killing the project.

…make Ballard fully unlivable.

I look forward to your “Ballard is Dying” special on Sinclair Media! Should be good for a laugh or two.

Newton
Member
Newton

I am well aware of the Seattle Monorail Project details – a Sound Transit study that misestimated the vehicle tax estimate that led to a 30-35% shortfall in funding. The gave Nichols and Horn the opportunity to negotiate with the investment bankers in secret (no transparency) which resulted in bonds to be paid in perpetuity because there was so little money pledged up front. Thus the monorail would have been paid for until the country collapses (maybe not so far off). The bottom line conclusion is that if the city had wanted this project to work, as the voters requested, they would have kicked in more money from property taxes to offset the egregious errors in the Sound Transit study. Of the many votes that were taken, only the first one authorized real money. It is a well established belief that Nichols did not want this project to go forward because it involved building towers, rails and cars outside of King county so the King county local unions would not get enough cut on the money for the project. Bombardier would have built the trains so that would have sent much of the money to Montreal as well. However, like… Read more »

Truth
Member
Truth

I am well aware of the Seattle Monorail Project details – a Sound Transit study that misestimated the vehicle tax estimate that led to a 30-35% shortfall in funding.

The gave Nichols and Horn the opportunity to negotiate with the investment bankers in secret (no transparency) which resulted in bonds to be paid in perpetuity because there was so little money pledged up front.

It is a well established belief that Nichols did not want this project to go forward because it involved building towers, rails and cars outside of King county so the King county local unions would not get enough cut on the money for the project.

You are making a lot of claims here and seem to be conflating the Seattle Monorail Project with Sound Transit. But if your following statement is true, you should have no problem providing sources for your claims:

I assumed that most people who had been here a while and had the strong opinions that you do, knew this story well.

Dan Strauss's Luscious Lips
Member
Dan Strauss's Luscious Lips

I thought everyone has to work from home. Is this to move junkies and anarchists around town?

Truth
Member
Truth

The outside is very scary pookie! I would recommend not venturing far from your sub-basement troll cave.

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